Bear Yuba Land Trust set to hold annual Community BioBlitz | TheUnion.com

Bear Yuba Land Trust set to hold annual Community BioBlitz

Submitted to The Union
The Bear Yuba Land Trust is playing host to its annual Community BioBlitz on Saturday.
Submitted photo

KNOW & GO

WHAT: Bear Yuba Land Trust’s Annual Community BioBlitz

WHEN: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday

WHERE: Rice’s Crossing North Preserve

DIRECTIONS: From Nevada City, take Highway 49 toward Camptonville, turn left on Marysville Road and cross over the Bullards Bar Dam. Rice’s Crossing Preserve is located 1.3 miles from the dam. Park in the rock quarry on the right and cross the road to the North Meadow where you will find the Yuba Rim Trailhead.

INFO: Call 530-272-5994, email Felicia@BYLT.org or sign up at www.bylt.org. Wear sturdy footwear and weather-appropriate clothing that can get dirty. Bring sun and insect protection, snacks, a brown-bag picnic lunch and water as well as extra paper, pen or pencils, binoculars or a hand lens and colored pencils if you have them.

SCHEDULE: 10 a.m. — Arrive at the parking area.

10:15 a.m. — Event begins with an overview of the Preserve and goals for the BioBlitz

10:30 a.m. to noon — BioBlitz field observations

Noon — Picnic lunch, visit expert tables to learn more about local plants and animals

1 p.m. — End of Community BioBlitz

Rice’s Crossing North Preserve near Bullards Bar Dam is the location of this year’s Bear Yuba Land Trust annual Community BioBlitz, set for 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, according to a release.

During the springtime event, participants armed with cameras and notebooks will become “citizen scientists,” documenting and identifying many of the plants, animals, fungi and other organisms they see.

Located along a six-mile span on both sides of the Yuba River in the counties of Yuba and Nevada, The Bear River Land Trust’s newest and largest property, Rice’s Crossing Preserve comprises 2,707 acres extended from Bullards Bar Reservoir to the north and South Yuba River State Park and Englebright Reservoir bordering the southern end. The wildlife and wildflowers are abundant, and the river canyon is stunning, making it the perfect location for a BioBlitz.

‘What is a BioBlitz?’

A BioBlitz is an event that is focused on gathering as much biological data in a specific area in a short amount of time.

Participating community members will develop scientific skills such as observing, recording data and identifying different plants, animal and fungi species to capture a biological snapshot of the land.

Observations can be made by journaling in a field notebook, which will be provided, or by taking photographs with a smartphone or digital camera of all the organisms found on the preserve; this visual data will be uploaded to iNaturalist, a citizen science project and online social network of naturalists, citizen scientists, and biologists built on the concept of mapping and sharing observations of biodiversity across the globe.

These annual BioBlitz’s are important because the observations made during them will help maintain a permanent record to help the trust’s land managers track the health of an ecosystem over time.

Participants will spend a day outdoors with like-minded folks who also love nature, along with experts who will assist with species identification, helping folks learn more about plants, fungi, animals, butterflies, bees and birds. This year’s experts include Rick Ramos, Shane Hanofee, Ted Beedy, Frank Van Hecke, John Lane and Jane Tavares.

For this year’s event, the trust has also partnered with the Sacramento Region’s City Nature Challenge and Know Your Watershed. The City Nature Challenge began as a nature-observation competition between the San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles County in 2016.

Since then, the competition has expanded to nearly 70 cities worldwide. Know Your Watershed is a month-long collaborative celebration of our watersheds with outdoor activities, water education, and environmental stewardship provided by dozens of our community’s premier outdoor and environmental organizations.

Source: Bear Yuba Land Trust


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