John Seivert: A decade of the TDS Enduro Mountain bike race | TheUnion.com
YOUR AD HERE »

John Seivert: A decade of the TDS Enduro Mountain bike race

April 23 and 24 was the tenth running of the world-renowned TDS Enduro Mountain bike race at the Sanchez Ranch in Grass Valley. In this invite-only event, one hundred and twenty professional mountain bike riders specializing in downhill, free-riding and enduro racing were eager to test their technical downhill skills. That’s right, invited. This race attracts the best in the business, and a look at the roster confirmed that this would indeed be one heck of a race. Golf has the Master’s, MLB and NBA have their respective All-Star games; Enduro Mountain bike racing has The TDS Enduro Mountain bike race right here in Grass Valley.

Enduro mountain bike racing is akin to downhill skiing, except that the riders will race down eleven different runs for a time in enduro racing. The race covers two full days of racing. Like all stage races in cycling, the winner is the fastest overall (least amount of time). These races are so competitive that many enduro races are decided within seconds. After this year’s racing, the winner’s margin of the 2022 edition of the TDS Enduro Mountain bike race was less than one second.

From Grass Valley and now residing in Bellingham, Washington, Myles Morgan was the overall winner by a margin of one second. Myles placed second last year by one second. After two full days of racing, the margin for these athletes is so close that one simple bobble can make the difference between winning and second place. Myles is fully sponsored by Evil Bikes located in Bellingham, Washington, and is now racing nationally and internationally.



Evil Bikes’ newly elected CEO, Jason Moeschler, was on hand to see his riders finish first, third and fifth overall. Jason and his wife Lisa, also from Nevada County, have been involved in the sport for several decades. Jason has raced professionally and has also competed at the TDS Enduro race for many years found he had his hands full managing his new position and making sure his team was in top shape for the event.

Local Riders results

Another standout performance in the men’s field was 18-year-old Anthony Pritchett from Nevada City. Anthony is a Nevada Union High School senior who races on the local You Bet Gravity Racing Team out of the You Bet Bicycle Shop in Nevada City. He finished tenth overall in a stacked field of professional racers. Eleventh place finisher Mason Bond, also from Nevada City, was right on his heels. He now resides in Cottonwood, Arizona. Other racers from the You Bet team were Logan Connors (59th), Dave Moyer (66th), and Malia Morgan (13th), who happens to be overall winner Myles Morgan’s little sister. Tour of Nevada City Bike Shop had two racers competing this year. Austin Gilchrist finished 39th, and Matteo Pierazzi had a strong performance for his first-ever Enduro racing finishing in 64th place.



The local talent was impressive in the women’s field of seventeen riders. Amy Morrison of Carson City, Nevada, placed second, and sixteen-year-old Erin Bixler from Auburn, California, third. Erin Bixler, who is only a junior at Wy’ East Academy in Sandy, Oregon, will start her senior year at Colfax high school in the fall. Amy Morrison won the event last June.

There are risks of crashes in extreme sports, such as enduro bike racing. The crashes resulted in many riders sporting road rash and a few bruised bodies and egos. This year we had very few injuries. We had a few lacerations, a few sprained shoulders, stiff necks, bruised ribs, and backs that all needed our attention. We were able to handle everything thrown at us. The TDS Enduro medical team was made up of three MDs, two nurse practitioners, and two physical therapists. All staff has wilderness medicine certifications as well as emergency medicine specialties. These are the skills needed when putting on a mountain bike event with potentially dangerous consequences from flying down a mountain at high speeds on rocky terrain.

Jon Pritchett runs the TDS Enduro Mountain bike medical team. Olivia Pritchett, Bouchier and Pritchett Family Medicine office manager, organized the event. The race medical staff included Dan Goldsmith, MD, Adrienne Knapp, RN, BSN, Rob Bixler, MD, FAWM, Jed Colvin, FNP-C, Richard Goddard, MD, John Seivert, PT, DPT, and Sophia Delegard, PT, DPT. It truly does take a village to make an event world-class.

The e-bike category had several amazing athletes shredding down the trails for the second year in a row. That’s right, e-bikes are welcome and integrated into almost every discipline of bike racing these days. TDS Race director Ron Sanchez is a big supporter of the e-bike division and has now referred to us mountain bike riders without batteries as riding Me-bikes, Amish bikes, or push bikes, as the Australians call them. It is excellent seeing any bike on the local trails. The more people that get on bikes to enjoy the local trails, the healthier our population can become.

Local mountain bike rider and photographer Mike Oitzman was on hand again this year, capturing the event. You can see his fantastic action shots of this event at http://www.mikeoitzmanphotography.com and all the information needed to understand this intense culture of intense enduro mountain bike racing by checking out the TDS website http://www.tdsenduro.com.

The 2023 edition of the TDS Enduro Mountain bike race will return on the third weekend of April next year. Keep an eye out for this event if you want to witness some of the world’s most skilled downhill mountain bike racers. You won’t be disappointed, but maybe go straight to your local bike shop, pick up a mountain bike, and start riding. If you have issues that don’t allow you to ride, an e-bike could be just the thing to get you on the trails.

John Seivert is a doctor of physical therapy and he has been practicing for 34 years. He opened Body Logic Physical Therapy in Grass Valley in 2001. He has been educating physical therapists since 1986. Contact him at bodylogic2011@ yahoo.com

Austin Gilchrist, 39th overall in the men's pro division, shredding down the trail in deep concentration.
Photo by John Seivert

 

Anthony Pritchett is ripping down the most challenging trail, Vigilante, without a problem cruising to a 10th place finish in the men's pro division.
Photo by John Seivert

Support Local Journalism


Support Local Journalism

Readers around Grass Valley and Nevada County make The Union’s work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Your donation will help us continue to cover COVID-19 and our other vital local news.

 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User


Health

Dr. Jeff Kane: Rx: Humor

|

A Gary Larson cartoon depicts a group of doctors on rounds, pointing and laughing at a patient. It’s captioned, “Doctors researching whether humor aids healing.”



See more