Lisa Schliff: Why the attack on SNAP by Congress? | TheUnion.com
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Lisa Schliff: Why the attack on SNAP by Congress?

In September, Congress will return from recess to attempt more slashing of anti-poverty programs that have helped so many low-income families. One of the most effective and important of these is SNAP (food stamps).

SNAP has allowed millions of Americans to get food on the table when they have been laid off, injured or disabled. SNAP kept 4.6 million people from descending into poverty in 2015, according to the U.S. Census.

So why the attack on SNAP by Congress?



Conservatives want to convert it into a block grant, a sneaky way of shifting most of the expense from the federal to the state budget. This will shortchange the program and force people deeper into poverty. Nearly one in five children in the U.S. lives in a family struggling against hunger. Children are our future. We owe it to them to fully fund this anti-poverty program. Now is the time to call our members of Congress and ask them to safeguard SNAP from cuts and block grants.

Those who need the help right here in Nevada County and throughout Congressman Doug LaMalfa’s District 1 will be grateful.




Lisa Schliff

Grass Valley


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