Barb Rivenes: Why does the time we use electricity matter? | TheUnion.com

Barb Rivenes: Why does the time we use electricity matter?

Did you know that the costs for PG&E of purchasing and delivering electricity can rise to 25 to 50 times the cost paid by customers in order to meet peak demand in the summer months? These costs are already accounted for in our bills. What can we do to minimize this effect?

It turns out these peak periods often occur between 4 and 9 p.m., as low-cost solar ramps down and people return home and turn on their appliances and air conditioners. By voluntarily reducing electricity use during these peak periods, you can save money on your electricity bill and help all customers save money.

If you are on time of use rates, the default rate plan by PG&E in 2020, you can save money by following these simple tips:

Turn off non-essential lighting and electronic devices between 4 and 9 p.m.

Use timers to run appliances like dishwashers, washing machines, and electric water heaters during off-peak hours.

Adjust your thermostat to save energy and pre-cool your home outside of peak hours.

Charge your battery-powered devices such as electric cars overnight after the peak demand period ends.

For details about your specific rates, contact your energy provider.

Barb Rivenes

Grass Valley


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