Darrell Berkheimer: Time for Mueller to conclude meddling probe | TheUnion.com

Darrell Berkheimer: Time for Mueller to conclude meddling probe

Darrell Berkheimer
Columnist

I suspect many citizens will agree that it's time to conclude the investigation into the 2016 election meddling — and with a complete public report on the findings.

We have a nation of citizens divided and disgusted, and some who are downright angry, over the circumstances involved in the investigation.

I think we all are tired of the continual piecemeal reports, speculations, opinions and finger-pointing coming through various social media, from TV talking heads and from our politicians. Much of it merely creates more anger and divisiveness in those lining up for or against the issues and people involved.

Our collective patience has been tested, and now we deserve conclusions.

Our collective patience has been tested, and now we deserve conclusions.

Recommended Stories For You

It was two years ago that the FBI began its investigation of Russian meddling into our election, according to former FBI Director James Comey. Although our leaders in Congress were told about that prior to the election, they would not agree to allow the FBI and President Barack Obama to inform the public.

And now it's been 14 months since the appointment of Special Counsel Robert Mueller to continue that probe. Mueller received the benefit of what the FBI already uncovered; and he also was directed to determine whether any individuals associated with President Donald Trump's election campaign cooperated with Russians.

It was only 12 months from when Archibald Cox was appointed special prosecutor in the Watergate break-in (May 18, 1973) to when the House Judiciary Committee initiated impeachment proceedings against President Richard Nixon (May 9, 1974). And the Cox probe was climaxed within 15 months by Nixon's resignation on Aug. 8, 1974.

Next month will mark 15 months since Mueller's appointment. So it would be best for all if he concluded his probe by September – by at least six weeks before our midterm voting. That allows time for all to examine the ramifications before voting.

Many charges already have been filed; and many facts have been determined regarding Trump campaign staff members and their meetings with influential Russians.

We already have guilty pleas by five Americans as a result of Mueller's investigation. And I expect we will see more Americans charged within the next few weeks.

With Mueller's 29 pages of indictments against a dozen Russian military officers, a total of 25 Russian citizens have been charged. The latest charges also indicate Mueller has uncovered many specific details, including verbatim messages and conversations those Russians had with American citizens.

Mueller has proven his thoroughness with those results.

So now it's time to end the speculation on whether other criminal or treasonous acts occurred – and by whom.

I believe most of us are just getting damn tired of it all. And voters deserve a public report with final conclusions prior to this November's midterm congressional elections.

We deserve to be provided with specifics on election tampering rather than continued speculations that provoke mounting divisiveness, disgust and anger.

We also want to know details about what actions are being taken to keep Russia and any other foreign countries from meddling in our elections in the future – and especially for this November.

I don't care whether you are liberal, conservative, independent or whatever, we as voters should not be expected to go into November's election with an unknowing cloud of wondering how Mueller's investigation will end.

Meanwhile, many contentious domestic issues and foreign policies are not getting the proper attention they deserve as a result of the continual distractions caused by the speculation on Mueller's probe.

Voters should not be forced to wait until after November's midterm elections to learn the facts about which Americans participated or deliberately assisted in the Russian meddling.

Afterward, we don't want voters to be saying: "If I knew all that when I voted, I would have voted differently."

Collusion may not be a crime; but conspiring with members of foreign nations to ignore and break our U.S. laws falls into the realm of treason. And November's voters deserve to know who merely colluded and who is being charged with conspiracy.

Darrell Berkheimer, who lives in Grass Valley, is a frequent contributor to The Union. He is the author of five books available through Amazon. Contact him at mtmrnut@yahoo.com.