Florence Hosbein: Gilded Springs is unwanted sprawl | TheUnion.com

Florence Hosbein: Gilded Springs is unwanted sprawl

Florence Hosbein
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The Union Editorial Board has recommended that concerned citizens give their input regarding the proposed Gilded Springs subdivision in Grass Valley.

As a resident of West Main Street, I am deeply concerned about this proposed subdivision, which would extend from West Main Street to the top of Alta Street.

In 1963, my husband and I moved to Grass Valley with our four children, and our fifth was born here. We fell in love with this historic mining town and moved here for two reasons: No. 1, the town needed a surgeon, and No. 2, we wanted a small town community in which to raise our family.

I'm writing this letter because any developments done here should always respect the historic and small town values of this community. I realize we are move ins, and I do not want to close the door on others who wish to move here, or to be interpreted as anti-growth. However, I am opposed to growth which doesn't fit in with the best interests and highest needs of this community.

May we all come together to oppose the irrevocable changes that a subdivision like this will impose on our town.

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I have lived in a historic home in the 1872 Township of Grass Valley for 55 years. Our house is No. 2 on the historic registry and was built in 1883. We have lovingly maintained the property, respecting its historical and cultural heritage.

There are many homes on the registry in Grass Valley, and they are maintained in excellent condition. The Grass Valley Historical Commission has been diligent and tireless in preserving and maintaining our small-town, early California atmosphere. This quality is one of the primary reasons tourists and new residents value our community.

I am deeply concerned about this proposed subdivision not only for historical and cultural reasons, but also because of its environmental and density impact. Many current residents have moved to Grass Valley to avoid the negative issues of over-development including:

Too many people packed on top of each other.

Too much concrete.

Too much traffic.

Too much stress.

This transformation from a small town to suburban sprawl is happening at an accelerated rate, and before we know it our town will be unrecognizable. We need to wake up and protect our small-town environment, heritage, and community from inappropriate development.

As I write this letter there are four subdivisions in production, and this proposed subdivision will be the fifth. This one is particularly unacceptable because it is being built on heritage property No. 6 which was built as a farm in 1864, and which is one of the four heritage homes on Linden Avenue. This 1872 historic core is one of the areas which gives Grass Valley its historic charm and Gold Rush town identity.

In addition, several other aspects of this proposed development need to be addressed:

It is the headwaters for Peabody Creek, which is not a seasonal creek as identified in the environmental impact report.

A large, lower portion of the property is wetlands.

The current roadways, West Main Street and Alta Street, cannot be expanded without destroying existing homes.

These streets are already overburdened with traffic.

I attended the Grass Valley Development Review Committee meeting on May 22 and the neighborhood meeting with Tobin Daugherty's team on June 9. I was dismayed by the Grass Valley development director's lack of concern regarding the issues I've outlined above.

This development needs to be thoughtfully discussed by our community. We do not need to erase our past in order to create our future. We invite like-minded citizens of Nevada County to join us.

Please call 530-793-3187 for information on how to participate in creatively protecting our beloved community and its growth. What we're looking for is dialogue, communication and transparency.

May we all come together to oppose the irrevocable changes that a subdivision like this will impose on our town.

Florence Hosbein lives in Grass Valley.

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