Vintage on Mill coming soon to Grass Valley | TheUnion.com

Vintage on Mill coming soon to Grass Valley

Sam Corey
Staff Writer

KNOW & GO

What: Vintage on Mill

When: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Sunday

Where: 117 Mill St., Grass Valley

The clothes help her travel through time, stretching back to people who occupied a variety of spaces.

This has been Susan Escano’s metaphorical experience rummaging through, refurbishing and selling vintage items: she’s able to dig further into people’s lives — their desires, loves and fears — anchoring those emotions to a particular moment in time.

The shop owner of Vintage on Main originally became interested in the art and history of what’s vintage because of the old worlds they make newly available.

“I’m drawn to old mirrors for some reason,” said Escano. People say to her they’re dirty, but she responds: “Do you know how many faces (have) looked in that mirror?”

Now, the shop owner is taking over the storefront of what was previously Lisa Swarthout’s Mill Street Clothing Co.

Beginning as Vintage on Neal, Escano now has Vintage on Main and Vintage on Mill, which officially opens Nov. 25.

The business, she said, will be the same as the others, but within a larger space. She won’t be hiring more employees, but is rather spreading them across her different shops.

Importantly, Escano notes she predominately sells vintage goods (anything younger than 100 years) not “antiques” (anything older than 100 years).

EVERYTHING COMES BACK

Store shoppers, said Escano, are re-fabricating, recycling and reusing clothing and furniture.

“The clothing I wore in high school, it’s all back — the bell bottoms, the embroider jeans, the platform shoes — all of that,” she said.

Millennials, she said, tend to be more interested in the 1940s and 1950s eras.

The store owner appreciates collecting and sharing stuff from a range of time. She said she’s found old letters, hair nets and a variety of other items inside furniture she buys at estate sales.

She used to be so drawn to vintage items, she would pick them up off the side of the road, refurbish and paint them before selling them to the public.

Everything in her home — except her couch and bed — have been repurposed, she said.

It’s a style she’s helped community residents bask in as they still yearn to keep their homes similar to the Victorian era.

To contact Staff Writer Sam Corey, email scorey@theunion.com or call 530-477-4219.


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