All-time great volleyball player Brie Lampe Hull to be inducted into Nevada Union Athletics Hall of Fame | TheUnion.com

All-time great volleyball player Brie Lampe Hull to be inducted into Nevada Union Athletics Hall of Fame

Editor's note: This is the 16th installment of a 17-part series chronicling the 2018 Nevada Union Athletics Hall of Fame inductees.

It was a simple, yet telling play.

Brie Lampe Hull soared into the air during a high school volleyball game, spiked the ball over the net, sending it past a couple blockers and off the head of an opposing player. The opposing player was knocked unconscious.

Hull was mortified. And, a little bit encouraged.

"It was a moment of fear because I felt horrible for that girl, and I instantly started crying," Hull said. "But, it also showed me that I have the power to do that, and there is potential there."

Hull was always a skilled athlete, excelling in tennis and basketball before high school. She was introduced to volleyball in junior high and from there she experienced a meteoric rise in the sport.

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"Volleyball became an instant favorite," she said.

Hull was a decorated multi-sport star at Nevada Union, and for her efforts as a Miner and beyond, the 1998 graduate is being inducted into the Nevada Union Athletics Hall of Fame.

While at Nevada Union, Hull was a standout on the basketball team, but it was on the volleyball court where she found great success and a path to playing at a division I college.

Hull was a three-year varsity player on the volleyball team. In her sophomore and junior seasons, Hull was an All-Capital Athletic League selection. In her senior season, the powerful hitter was awarded the Capital Athletic League MVP, was an Optimist All-Star and was named Nevada Union's Female Athlete of the Year.

Hull gives a lot of the credit for her success on the volleyball court to coach Robert Sharp.

"He put in the extra time and it was a huge blessing because it was what I needed to get to the next level," she said.

Hull also starred on the basketball team, playing on the varsity squad her sophomore and junior seasons.

She was also strong in the classroom as well, earning her way onto the principal's list all four years at NU.

Heading into her senior year at Nevada Union, Hull verbally committed to attend and play volleyball at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She dropped basketball, joined a club volleyball team in Sacramento and dedicated herself completely to the sport.

"Volleyball became life," said Hull.

While at UCSB, Hull was a four-year member of the volleyball team, which was regularly ranked in the Top 25. In her senior season with the Gauchos, she earned All-Big West First Team honors.

"By the end of my time there, I was really pleased with what I was able to do," Hull said.

It was at UCSB she developed a passion for coaching and mentoring young people. From there she became a teacher. She spent 10 years teaching at Blue Oaks Elementary School.

Hull has also done impressive work organizing walk-a-thon fundraisers to benefit various causes including Cystic Fibrosis, a disorder that Hull was diagnosed with at the age of 16.

"I knew that I could help raise money by doing simple things," she said. "There are a lot of amazing treatments that help me live almost a normal life, and that's because of fundraising."

Nowadays Hull is happily married to Mark and is a stay-at-home mother of five children, Tilden, 9, Katelyn, 7, Kennedy, 7, Luke, 2, and Cody, 2.

She stays active, recently completing a half marathon and she also helps out coaching her kids' sports teams.

Hull said she is honored and excited to be inducted into the Nevada Union Athletics Hall of Fame. Making it even more special is being inducted alongside her older brother Brandon.

"That is the part I'm most excited about," she said. "That we get to go in together. I always looked up to my brother. He was always the biggest man on campus. It's very exciting that we both get to be a part of this."

Hull added the honor wouldn't be possible without the love and support of her parents, Karen and Barney.

"What sticks out in my mind the most are the people that made this possible and that's my parents," she said. "For making the sacrifices to get me the sporting equipment I needed, for driving me all the way to Sacramento a couple of times a week, giving their weekends up for tournaments and for just believing in me and giving me all these opportunities."

To contact Sports Editor Walter Ford, call 530-477-4232 or email wford@theunion.com.

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