Schedule of Earth Day events | TheUnion.com
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Schedule of Earth Day events

Today is the second day of Earth Day activities at Sierra College in which over 16 organizations are participating. From 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., there is music, dance, poetry, even a fashion show. On Sierra College Boulevard; admission is free but parking is $1.

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Saturday afternoon is an hour of Earth Day storytelling for young children, ages 3-8, at The Book Seller. Selections include old favorites as well as newly published gems, all with a nature or wildlife theme.



Among the guest readers are the author and illustrator team of Nicholas Cravotta and Rebecca Bleau, creators of “The Tree Farmer,” a boldly illustrated book that takes young readers on a magical journey though the forest in a tale about the gifts of trees and the tree farmer’s responsibility to care for them.

The time is 3-4 p.m.; it’s free, and children have to be accompanied by an adult. Call The Book Seller, 107 Mill St., at 272-2131 for more information. For more about the event, go online at http://www.theunion.com/entertainment.




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In honor of earth day, Organic Flood (OF) is doing a Saturday show at the Iron Door, which is quickly becoming a cool new venue for live music and performance art; it’s downstairs in the Holbrooke Hotel.

This young local band is drenched in blues, rock, jazz, funk-driven conscious hip-hop and mountain music, and its lyrics are intelligent. In addition to performing, band members will be raffling off Earth Day goodies. They say that everyone who wears a recycled outfit doesn’t have to pay the $3 cover.

The fun starts 9 p.m. at 212 W. Main St. Call OF at 292-3750 for more information

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“Kids Are The Future!” takes place Sunday between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. at upper Loma Rica Ranch, next to historic Lake MacBoyle. The free celebration will include ecological displays, nonprofit and Earth-friendly business vendors, food, and kids crafts. Enjoy poets, speakers and live music by favorite local musicians in a beautiful, grassy setting. Rain or shine (bring a picnic). KVMR radio 89.5 FM will broadcast live; SYRCL is also involved. Directions to Lake MacBoyle: From Brunswick, take Loma Rica Drive, then take the first left. For more information, call 274-0360 or 277-0610 or go online at http://www.nevadacountygreens.org. For the full schedule, go to http://www.theunion.com/entertainment.

In Nevada City

“Ani Williams is one of the most celebrated harpists and singers of her

generation, a pioneer in women’s sacred music.”

-Musik International

Harpist, chantress and pioneer in sound medicine, Ani Williams will present a “Concert for the Earth” at Wild Mountain Yoga Center Friday evening.

Williams has been performing her enchanting music around the world since 1985. Her music features intriguing musical scales and a healing voice that reaches inside the heart. Ani will invite the audience to sing and chant along in gratitude for the Earth. Her CDs will be available at the concert, which begins at 7:30 p.m. at 574 Searls Ave., Nevada City.

Tickets are $12 if purchased ahead of time at BriarPatch in Grass Valley or at Harmony books in Nevada City; $15 at the door. Call Gaia at 477-1918 for more information or go online at http://www.aniwilliams.com. Williams will be presenting a workshop the next day in Rocklin.

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“In Your Own Backyard: Understanding the Ecology of your Land,” a one-day workshop by two organizations, including the Sierra Nevada Deep Ecology Institute, will be held Saturday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. It will include a lecture, hike and field instruction – all for $40, plus $2 for handout. Car pool from the Rood Center to Camp Augusta in Nevada City. Call 265-6649 or 272-7132 for more information (what to wear and bring) and to register.

Tips for Earth Day

1. Get off to a clean start: Take a shower with soaps and shampoos made with organic ingredients. Then, serve someone special an organic breakfast in bed with certified organic orange juice, coffee, fresh fruit, cereal, yogurt and eggs.

2. Create a celebratory meal that’s as close to 100 percent organic as possible. Invite friends and family to enjoy and help cook. It can be an organic picnic, pizza party, barbecue or high tea. Try Organic Valley’s Earth Day Creativity Cards for a fun dinner table game (www.earthdinner.org)

3. At the peak of the season (May through October), go to your local farmer’s market and buy from your favorite organic farmer. Approximately 40-60 percent of all growers at farmers markets are organic.

4. Building healthy soil is a key tenet of organic farming. A great way to guarantee rich, organic soil is to start composting. Contact your local library or Cooperative Extension office for composting information.

5. Release “beneficial insects” (good bugs that keep away the bad bugs) in your organic garden. Ladybugs don’t just bring good luck, they also serve as natural defenders for your garden’s plants. Green Lacewing Larvae (considered the “garbage disposal bug” of the insect world) are hardworking and hungry If they’re not available at your local garden supply, you can get a list of garden suppliers by visiting The Organic Pages Online at http://www.theorganicpages.com.

6. Play the Environmental Game at http://www.organicearthday.org.

7. Be a big “softie” and treat yourself (or someone special) to a pair of 100 percent organic cotton socks or anything made with snugly organic fleece. Studies have shown that in the U.S., it takes about one-third of a pound of chemicals to grow enough non-organic cotton for one T-shirt.

8. Remember your pooch! Give your furry friend an organic dog wash and treat him or her to an organic doggie biscuit.

9. Raise a toast to organic! Whether you enjoy a glass of organic wine, lemonade or tomato juice, there are numerous organic libations and refreshments that will wet your whistle.

10. Slumber soundly and organically – sip organic chamomile tea and slip under your organic cotton sheets.

Visit http://www.organicearthday.org for more tips, coupons, recipes and educational materials.


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