No needles in the trash | TheUnion.com
YOUR AD HERE »

No needles in the trash

Come Sept. 1, people using hypodermic needles can no longer put them into their trash.

California is among a small but growing number of states trying to get needles out of the waste stream. An estimated 3 billion needles and syringes wind up in the trash or flushed down toilets each year, according to Waste Management Inc., which serves western Nevada County.

“This improper disposal puts sanitation workers and the public at risk of needle sticks and serious infections,” Waste Management officials said. “The new (state) law will prohibit needles in any household waste, including recycling or green waste bins.”



Waste Management is working with a private company, Sharps Compliance Inc. of Houston, to help people find a safe way to get rid of their needles. For a charge, Sharps will mail out containers with return postage pre-paid. When they are full, people can return the containers by U.S. Mail, and Sharps will destroy them.

Prices range from $33.62 for a quart container, containing up to 70 needles, to $82.50 for a 3-gallon container, containing up to 720 needles, said Sharps spokeswoman Bergundi Walker.




Some doctors are providing postage-paid disposal containers for free, Walker added.

But she urged people to beware: Some companies provide disposal containers, but no way to get rid of the containers once they’re full.

Sharps containers can be seen at No needles in the trash

By Trina Kleist

Staff Writer

Come Sept. 1, people using hypodermic needles can no longer put them into their trash.

California is among a small but growing number of states trying to get needles out of the waste stream. An estimated 3 billion needles and syringes wind up in the trash or flushed down toilets, according to Waste Management Inc., which serves western Nevada County.

“This improper disposal puts sanitation workers and the public at risk of needle sticks and serious infections,” Waste Management officials said. “The new (state) law will prohibit needles in any household waste, including recycling or green waste bins.”

Waste Management is working with a private company, Sharps Compliance Inc. of Houston, to help people find a safe way to get rid of their needles. For a charge, Sharps will mail out containers with return postage pre-paid. When they are full, people can return the containers by U.S. Mail, and Sharps will destroy them.

Prices range from $33.62 for a quart container, containing up to 70 needles, to $82.50 for a 3-gallon container, containing up to 720 needles, said Sharps spokeswoman Bergundi Walker.

Some doctors are providing postage-paid disposal containers for free, Walker added. But she urged people to beware: Some companies provide disposal containers, but no way to get rid of the containers once they’re full.

To see Sharps products, visit http://www.wastemd.com and click “Products.” They cannot be purchased online; call Sharps toll-free at 1-877-927-8363.

To contact City Editor Trina Kleist, e-mail tkleist@theunion.com or call 477-4230.


Support Local Journalism


Support Local Journalism

Readers around Grass Valley and Nevada County make The Union’s work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Your donation will help us continue to cover COVID-19 and our other vital local news.

 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User