Nevada Irrigation District to host strategic plan workshops | TheUnion.com

Nevada Irrigation District to host strategic plan workshops

Look at the 2016-2018 strategic plan: Click here

A contentious debate has raged for years over the Nevada Irrigation District’s proposal to build the Centennial Dam on the Bear River.

Whether or not the water district actually needs a new multimillion-dollar reservoir has been the topic of multiple meetings, with some advocates asking NID staff to complete updates of its raw water master plan and strategic plan first.

Both of these processes now are moving forward.

On Tuesday, the distinct announced two public workshops focused on the update to the strategic plan. These public meetings will provide information about the plan and allow participants to offer input.

“This is an excellent opportunity for the public to proactively engage with district leadership, and to offer input for the district’s operations and water resource management activities in the coming years,” said General Manager Rem Scherzinger.

The community workshops will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Sept. 3 and Sept. 17 at the NID main office, 1036 W. Main St., Grass Valley. Both meetings will be managed by a professional facilitator.

The district last refined its strategic plan in 2016.

Raw Water Master Plan update

Last week, the district moved one step closer to updating its Raw Water Master Plan with the hiring of independent firm Raftelis to develop a public outreach strategy. The cost of the contract is $43,135, with an additional $3,000 for an optional online survey.

The raw water master plan update will develop a range of potential scenarios in order to meet the community’s demand for water through the next 50 years, while weighing the impact on the district, the community and the environment. The goal is to maximize public input and conduct an update process that is as open and transparent as possible.

Learn more about the process at planforwater.org.

The update process actually began last year, when the district hired The Kolbe Company for more than $800,000. The consultants were tasked with fostering a collaborative approach, but their contract was quickly terminated.

The Water and Hydroelectric Committee — which includes Directors Chris Bierwagen and Ricki Heck — then was charged with creating a stakeholder group, reviewing the public outreach design process and agreeing on a consultant.

This will be a two-part process, according to a staff report. Once the outreach process is designed by Raftelis and approved by the board, a request for proposals for implementation services will be developed. A consultant will be hired under a second contract to conduct that public outreach process.

To contact Staff Writer Liz Kellar, email lizk@theunion.com or call 530-477-4236.


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