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Music in the Mountains offers variety of genres

Carol Feineman

Between Tuesday and July 3, the 15 concerts presented during Music in the Mountains’ annual Summer Festival will cover classical masterpieces, swing jazz, pop, patriotic tunes and soulful blues.

All but two concerts – the Chamber Concerts, which will be at Peace Lutheran Church – are at the Nevada County Fairgrounds, either outdoors or in the Festival Center.

Tickets are now on sale for all concerts, as listed below.

“Jazz at the Festival,” Tuesday at 8 p.m. Back by popular demand to open the festival is B.E.D. playing jazz standards and eclectic selections featuring Becky Kilgore, Eddie Erickson, Dan Barrett and Dave Stone. At the fairground’s Festival Center.

“Roy Rogers & Norton Buffalo,” June 10 at 7:30 p.m. Slide guitarist Roy Rogers, an eight-time Grammy nominated producer/guitarist, works in the Americana Roots genre. Norton Buffalo is a harmonica player/vocalist in blues and rock. Outside at the fairgrounds.

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“Young Composers Showcase,” June 11 at 7:30 p.m. Under the direction of composers Howard Hersh, Mark Vance and Jay Sydeman, this concert features new works by young area composers. Tickets are $5 for adults and free for children under 18. At the Festival Center.

“Four Bitchin’ Babes,” June 12 at 7:30 p.m. The group returns from last year to sing more humorous observant tales of modern urban life. Outdoors.

Nevada County Composers’ Cooperative features world premiers June 13 at 8 p.m. Mark Vance, Jay Sydeman, Jerry Grant, Mikail Graham, Nancy Bloomer Deussen and Howard Hersh debut new works. At the Festival Center.

“Chamber Gems of the Ages,” June 17 at 8 p.m. Principal artists of the MIM Festival Orchestra and pianist Timothy Durkovic play Jacob’s “Swansea Town,” Bizet’s “Quintet” from “Carmen,” Beethoven’s “Piano Quintet in E flat Major” and Borodin’s “Piano Quintet in C minor.” At Peace Lutheran Church.

“Principal Artists of the Festival Orchestra,” June 19 at 8 p.m. Principal artists of the MIM Festival Orchestra and pianist Timothy Durkovic play works including Mozart’s “Eine Kleine Nacht Musik,” Britten’s “Phantasy for Oboe & Strings” and Bottesini’s “Concerto No. 2 for Double Bass” with guest soloist William Everett. At Peace Lutheran Church.

“European Symphonies,” June 22 at 8 p.m. Festival Orchestra with guest conductor Timothy Durkovic present Ralph Vaughan Williams’ Five Variants of “Dives and Lazarus, Franz Joseph Haydn’s “Symphony No. 95” and Felix Mendelssohn’s “Symphony No. 3 Scottish.” At the Festival Center.

“KinderKonzert,” June 23 at noon A shortened and free concert is for children under 12 and their adult guests. Outside.

“Concerto for Piano” June 25 at 8 p.m. Festival Orchestra with pianist Bryan Wallick will perform Schumann’s “Piano Concerto,” Deussen’s “Assent to Victory,” Mozart’s “Symphony No. 39” and Schubert’s “Overture in the Italian Style.” In 1997, Wallick won the Gold Medal at the Vladimir Horowitz International Piano Competition in Kiev, Ukraine. At the Festival Center.

“Jazz in the Pines,” June 26 at 7:30 p.m. The Festival Orchestra is joined by the New Black Eagle Jazz Band to play jazz favorites from Dave Brubeck to Duke Ellington. Outside.

“Bach, Beethoven & Grant,” June 27 at 2 p.m. Guest soloists Linus Eukel, Stephanie Johnson, Leanne Brand and Gary Aldrich along with the Music in the Mountains Festival Chorale and Orchestra present repertoire including J.S. Bach’s “Cantata No. 80” and Nevada City composer Jerry Grant’s “Rejoice.” At the Festival Center.

“Sassy and Saxy” June 30 at 8 p.m. Geordie Frazer on saxophone and soprano Kerry Walsh with the Festival Orchestra share Mozart’s “Symphony No. 29 in A Major,” Ibert’s “Concertino da Camera for Saxophone and Small Orchestra” and Canteloube’s “Chants d’Auvergne.” At the Festival Center.

“Orchestra Stars,” July 2 at 8 p.m. The Festival Orchestra with Robin Mayforth on violin, Jane Lenoir on flute, Neil Tatman on oboe, Tom Rose on clarinet and Carla Wilson on bassoon, will perform works of Thais’ “Massenet Meditation,” Vaughan Williams’ “The Lark Ascending,” Nielsen’s “Little Suite for Strings,” Nevada County composer Mark Vance’s world premiere of “Concerto for Winds,” Grieg’s “Elegiac Melodies & Norwegian Airs” and Mozart’s “Don Giovanni Overture.” At the Festival Center.

“Happy Birthday, USA,” July 3 at 7:30 p.m. Patriotic celebration features the Festival Orchestra, Chorus and narration by Foothill Theatre Company’s Philip Charles Sneed. Includes songs of freedom, songs from the past, songs from the Civil War era, songs from “Tin Pan Alley” and Broadway. Outside.

KNOW & GO

WHAT: Music in the Mountains’ Summer Festival 2004

WHEN: Tuesday through July 3

WHERE: Nevada County Fairgrounds at 11228 McCourtney Road and Peace Lutheran Church, 828 W. Main St., both in Grass Valley

ADMISSION: $16 in advance for adults and free for children 17 and under free for Outdoor Picnic and Pops concerts. $15 to $27 for adults and $5 for children 17 and under for all other concerts.

TICKETS: 265-6124 or (800) 218-2188, check the Web at http://www.musicinthemountains.org or visit the box office at 530 Searls Ave., Nevada City, between noon and 4 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Outdoor concert ticket outlets are The Union newspaper, Odyssey Books, Nevada City Postal Co., Mike’s Alta Sierra Market and Lake Wildwood’s Citizens Bank.


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