Lorraine’s Lowdown: Dog days of summer | TheUnion.com
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Lorraine’s Lowdown: Dog days of summer

By Lorraine Jewett | Special to The Union

Paws on Patrol. Canine cop Rüdiger is back on the beat after a severe injury, complicated surgery, and lengthy recovery. Rüdiger has been out on five months of “sick leave” from the Grass Valley Police Department. “One morning last fall, Rüdiger was awkwardly climbing the stairs, started falling backwards, and luckily I caught him,” recalls GVPD Canine Handler Jesse Cloyd, who has worked and lived with Rüdiger for three years. “Veterinary examinations revealed he had a sciatic nerve injury, likely incurred before he joined our force. The pinched nerve, inflammation, and bulging disc ultimately made it difficult for him to walk.” Rüdiger endured a multi-hour surgery and 20-plus staples to close the foot-long incision in his back. Jesse — who still had to perform his own job while Rüdiger recuperated at home — thanks his wife for helping keep Rüdiger calm, quiet, fed and medicated properly during the K9’s recovery…

K9 officer Rüdiger is back on the beat with the Grass Valley Police Department after he suffered a severe injury, then endured a complicated surgery and a five-month recovery.
Submitted to The Union

Rüdiger and Jesse Were Tested this week and recertified to resume patrols together. “Rüdiger performed better than any of the nine dogs there Thursday,” Jesse proclaims. The 7-year-old German shepherd passed all the tests: obedience on- and off-leash, suspect apprehension, and various narcotics detection scenarios. Jesse says the refresher training was welcome. “Handlers are supposed to be the smarter end of the leash, but ours is a perishable skill that needs practice,” Jesse explains in his usual self-deprecating manner. “For the handler, this work is a learned behavior. For the canine, it’s primal, instinctual, and natural. That’s why Rüdiger gets all the fame even though he and I are a team…”

The Nonprofit Rüdiger Foundation, which helps financially support five K9 officers in three local law enforcement agencies, paid for Rüdiger’s $11,850 surgery at UC Davis. Foundation president Tina Vernon says, “We were able to help Rüdiger get back to work thanks to generous donations from supporters…”



GeeVee Police Chief Alex Gammelgard is back after a week in Quantico, Virginia, at the FBI National Command Course. Alex was invited to apply to represent chiefs and sheriffs from the FBI field office in Sacramento, and he was honored to be selected to join other law enforcement leaders from the 56 FBI field offices across the country. The course was designed for leaders of law enforcement agencies with 50 officers/deputies or fewer. “We learned about the FBI’s mission of training local law enforcement leaders and how the FBI researches, tests, and recommends public safety equipment,” says Alex. “It was interesting to see the similarities and differences between local law enforcement agencies across our country, and I look forward to applying here in Grass Valley what I learned there. As law enforcement leaders, we are only as equipped and prepared as we are trained and informed…”

Grass Valley Police Chief Alex Gammelgard spent a week in Quantico, Virginia, at the FBI National Command Course. Chief Gammelgard said, “As law enforcement leaders, we are only as equipped and prepared as we are trained and informed.”
Submitted to The Union

Masks, Social Distancing, Caps and Gowns! High school graduation ceremonies will be held with all health protocols enforced. Details: Nevada Union grads can invite up to four immediate household members to the 9 a.m. or 6 p.m. ceremony June 9; required guest passes reserved by June 4. Four ticketed Bear River guests per grad will sit in the bleachers only in their student’s designated area at 6:30 p.m. June 11. Ghidotti graduates’ guests will sit apart from other households at 6 p.m. June 10, an outdoor walk-through only ceremony for North Point Academy grads and ticket-holder guests will take place 9 a.m. June 8, and Silver Springs graduates’ four guests will sit apart from other families 6:30 p.m. June 10…



NJUHSD Superintendent Brett McFadden says, “Yes, we’re going to do it and we’re going to do it right…”

Brian Smith Mixes Paint at B&C ACE Home & Garden Center, and makes it fun for the kiddies. “I show them the tints added to the paint, and have them guess what it will look like after it’s mixed,” says the ever-affable Brian. “After three minutes of mixing, the kids are amazed at the color of the finished product.” Mixing paint also helps Brian and his wife Pennie stay connected with their 27-year-old daughter Robin, who lives in Oregon. He takes pictures of the tints sitting atop the base paint and texts them to Robin; then each shares what they think they see in the mélange. “Occasionally we’ll send the photos to other people like an inkblot Rorschach test,” jokes Brian. “It can be scary what you learn about a person that way…”

Brian Smith and daughter Robin exchange ideas about what they see in Rorschach test-like photos after Brian adds tint to base paint at his job at B&C Ace Home & Garden Center. Brian sees an atomic bomb explosion here; Robin sees an aerial view of a lighthouse.
Submitted to The Union
Brian Smith adds tint to base paint at his job at B&C Ace Home & Garden Center to create the custom colors clients request, and the tints often create interesting designs. Smith said, “They’re like snowflakes. No two are the same.”
Submitted to The Union

Music in the Mountains Chorus members have enjoyed gathering for their first live, in-person rehearsals this month. They switched to Zoom practices at the outset of the pandemic in March 2020. Now they meet outdoors and wear masks, social distance, and check temperatures. The precautions are especially important since singing can be an effective way to spread COVID. “For many, this was the first time they were around friends in many, many months,” says MIM chorus member and Marketing and Donor Services Manager Hilary Hodge. “Hearing our chorus sing live, I felt like the gas tank of my soul was on full for the first time since 2020…”

Music in the Mountains chorus members have enjoyed gathering this month for their first live, in-person rehearsals after 14 months of Zoom practices.
Submitted to The Union

Rehearsals Are Going Well, technically as well as emotionally. MIM Conductor-Artistic Director Ryan Murray says, “It’s exciting to know that our Zoom rehearsals worked. It feels surreal to know that we haven’t sung together in over a year, and yet it sounds like we’ve been together this entire time.” Mark your calendars for July 3 when the MIM Chorus joins the 40th annual “Happy Birthday USA” performance at Western Gateway Park (http://www.MusicInTheMountains.org)…

Music in the Mountains Conductor-Artistic Director Ryan Murray said after the chorus resumed in-person live rehearsals, “It’s exciting to know that our Zoom rehearsals worked.”
Submitted to The Union

Team Geno Is Number One! The team is led by Cathy Anderson-Meyers, who raises money to defeat Alzheimer’s Disease, the illness that claimed the life of her beloved husband Geno Meyers in 2018. Cathy and 13 others each biked 25 miles in the virtual Ride to End Alzheimer’s. Cathy is the number one fundraiser in the nation with $7,238, and Team Geno is number one among teams after raising $7,802. “I so want to find a cure for this insidious disease,” says Cathy, “and 100% of the funds raised go toward the association’s efforts to discover methods of treatment and prevention for Alzheimer’s and other dementias.” As Cathy explains on her page linked to the Alzheimer’s Association (act.alz.org/goto/Riding4MyGeno), “There is no shortage of ideas in Alzheimer’s research — only dollars…”

Team Geno is the number one fundraising team in the nation after raising $7,802 to fund research to find a cure for Alzheimer’s Disease and other dementias.
Submitted to The Union
Team Geno is led by Cathy Anderson-Meyers, who raises money to defeat Alzheimer’s Disease, the illness that claimed the life of her beloved husband Geno Meyers in 2018. Cathy is the number one fundraiser in the nation after raising $7,238 to help find a cure for Alzheimer’s and other dementias.
Submitted to The Union

“Here’s Some Advice: At a job interview, tell them you’re willing to give 110 percent. Unless the job is a statistician.” – Adam Gropman, American stand-up comedian, writer, and entertainer…

Take an itsy bitsy, teeny tiny percentage of your day to send happy news to LorraineJewettWrites@gmail.com



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