Woolman School hosts day of work in support of Earth Day | TheUnion.com
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Woolman School hosts day of work in support of Earth Day

This Saturday, students, staff and community members of the Woolman Semester School support Earth Day by joining together for a day of work on the 230-acre campus. All are invited to come help out.

A semester program for high school juniors, seniors and gap-year students who hail from all over the country, Woolman offers the opportunity to learn firsthand about social and environmental justice.

Interacting with the land is a crucial component of their time spent at Woolman and has become an even larger part with the introduction of the Farm to Forest educational program in the spring of 2011.



The Farm to Forest program offers a new way of stewarding land. Instead of managing the garden, orchard, pasture, campus and forest separately, all units are seen as part of the whole environment that we as individuals are constantly impacting with every choice we make.

(T)he care for the land is not left to just the maintenance crew, but is taught through the academics to the students as well.

Now, the care for the land is not left to just the maintenance crew, but is taught through the academics to the students as well.




One of the main ways the students participate in caring for the land is through two-hour biweekly shared work crews.

This Saturday will demonstrate this new holistic approach to land stewardship.

Similar to shared work, there will be work crews in the garden, orchard and in the forest.

The forest crew this year has been working on a new project that was started by Environmental Studies teacher Jacob Holzberg-Pill.

This past June, Holzberg-Pill received the TogetherGreen Fellowship Grant from the National Audubon Society and Toyota to begin restoring an old mining ditch that circles Woolman’s property.

The immediate goal is to create an active swale as well as a road that will reduce erosion by increasing water recharge into the ground and encourage people to use the forest recreationally.

The long-term project will ultimately restore the land damaged by mining.

On Saturday, the forest crew will focus on removing Scotch broom, an invasive species that has spread along the swale.

“This day would not be possible without our partnership with the Fire Safe Council of Nevada County, donations from the National Wildlife Federation, and the hard work of our local community members,” Holzberg-Pill said.

Beginning at 9 a.m. on the Woolman Campus, located off Jones Bar Road, there will be work crews until noon and all are welcome to stay for lunch.

If interested, RSVP at http://woolman.org/events/2013/spring-work-day.


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