The End Zone: Touchdown Productions wraps career of community television | TheUnion.com

The End Zone: Touchdown Productions wraps career of community television

Jennifer Nobles
Staff Writer

For 21 years, Nevada County's most joyful and exultant memories have been captured by Gil Dominguez and his brainchild, Touchdown Productions.

The local production company specialized in televising and recording sports, dance, and community events, all through the lens of Dominguez and his crew.

However, with rising costs of living in California and an extended family in Texas, The Dominguez's are leaving Nevada County for Texas. Touchdown Productions has officially wrapped its final production, but Dominguez hopes to continue his passion for storytelling, possibly in the realm of sports announcing.

Dominguez and his wife Lyn first moved from Anaheim to Nevada City on the Fourth of July, 1997. That ended up being one of the last July Fourth holidays he would share with his family, as Touchdown Productions would soon begin filming the parades from a number of different locations on the parade route, a job Dominguez said was fun but demanding.

"Our first home was out in Cascade Shores," recalled Dominguez. "What a difference from Anaheim to the lake. It's like you took all your neighbors in Suburbia and just turned them all into trees."

After the initial culture shock wore off, Dominguez decided to put his experience in television — specifically, technical direction — to use in his new community.

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Dominguez decided to launch Touchdown by airing youth football games on community access television. That fall, they began covering Nevada Union football games. They would go on to cover many games both heartbreaking and triumphant, for Bear River, Nevada Union and Colfax high schools.

Expanding beyond the pigskin, Touchdown's sports coverage expanded not only to other athletics – volleyball and basketball among them – but to town events and celebrations. Their calendar was soon full with weddings, parades and telethons.

"One of my favorite shows was the Thursday Night Market shows," said Dominguez. "Because you are out there with the community. And generally, every time we go out, you're going into an environment where people are having fun."

Over the years, Touchdown moved from its initial home at Foothill Community Access Television to other local community access channels like NCTV. Now the work can be found on its own YouTube channel as well as the website, TouchdownProductions.com.

"It's truly a blessing to be like a storyteller," Dominguez said. "It's a blessing to be able to come in and do this kind of work, and create something (that) has an impact."

Dominguez said his wife and three children have made sacrifices of their own over the years in order to make Touchdown Productions a success.

"(They've) really sacrificed a lot," he said. "There's no way that I could ever repay them for putting up with dad doing this work, or having this vision of what community television can be."

As the Dominguez clan sets their GPS for their new home in Bryan-College Station, Texas, Gil admits it's bittersweet leaving the community he grew to love so much.

"It's been an honor and a privilege to represent everybody that we've represented and turn the cameras on the community," said Dominguez, "and let them see themselves and make those memories."

Dominguez thanks his friends, supporters, sponsors and viewers for allowing him to live out his dream for the past 21 years.

"You don't have enough time to say goodbye to everybody. This (article) is allowing us to say goodbye and thank you to everybody that's helped us, supported us, joked around with us, played with us, (and) was our friend, in all the different areas of life that is Nevada County.

"We're happy just to be a small part of it."

Jennifer Nobles is a staff writer for The Union. She can be reached at jnobles@theunion.com or 530-477-4231.

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