Public invited to invasive weed meeting in Truckee on Tuesday | TheUnion.com
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Public invited to invasive weed meeting in Truckee on Tuesday

Invasive weeds can lower the value of crops, disrupt the habitat of native birds and grab nutrients from the soil before local plants get the chance.

Those are a few reasons the Nevada County Fish and Wildlife Commission is hosting a Tuesday meeting on the issue.

The presentation – “The Aliens are Here – And Still Arriving!” – is scheduled for 6 p.m. at the Truckee Sanitary District, 12304 Joerger Drive, Truckee.



Attendees will hear from regional experts about invasive weeds and how to combat them.

“Like most things in the wild, these weeds don’t respect property lines, state lines. We’re all in this together.”Ray ButlerDistrict 5 commissioner of the Nevada County Fish and Wildlife Commission

“Invasive weeds are an identified problem,” said Ray Butler, District 5 commissioner of the Nevada County Fish and Wildlife Commission.




Speakers include Preston Neufeld, Nevada County agricultural commissioner biologist; Ed King, Placer County deputy agricultural commissioner; Susi Urie, Tahoe National Forest botanist; and Jeannette Halderman, Truckee River Watershed Council program manager.

According to Butler, invasive weeds are a significant problem for Nevada County because it rests in the crossroads of the intercontinental railroad, rivers moving both east and west and Interstate 80. All it takes for a seed to catch root is for it to fall off a passing truck.

“They modify existing ecosystems,” Butler said. “They frequently can out-compete native species.”

Additionally, invasive weeds often germinate before native plants. They pull nutrients from the soil before other vegetation gets the chance.

The foreign weeds can serve as fuel for wildfires — fires that can destroy regional vegetation, leaving the weeds free rein, Butler said.

People can fight back by volunteering with groups like the Weed Warriors, a group affiliated with the Truckee River Watershed Council. Butler encouraged people to learn more at http://www.truckeeriverwc.org.

“Like most things in the wild, these weeds don’t respect property lines, state lines,” Butler said. “We’re all in this together.”

To contact Staff Writer Alan Riquelmy, email ariquelmy@theunion.com or call 530-477-4239.


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