NU Tech welcomes students to new location | TheUnion.com

NU Tech welcomes students to new location

NU Tech High School will have a new location when classes officially begin Wednesday.

The continuation school has moved from its prior locale in the B-wing of Nevada Union High School to the Buena Vista Street space in Grass Valley previously occupied by Sierra Academy of Expeditionary Learning.

NU Tech's student body is mostly made up of kids who have either fallen behind in a traditional classroom environment or who seek to spend their high school years on a particular career trajectory.

The new location will house the school, which instructor Lori Osmond said will be fully Americans with Disabilities Act compliant, and will grant the school field use and classrooms that have been completely redone over the summer break.

"We are a little-known secret," said Osmond, "and we want to be known as the school of choice."

The school focuses on career readiness, offering students a flexible schedule and work experience.

Recommended Stories For You

"We have students that want to excel and graduate early," Osmond said. "(Some) want to work up to full-time, which they legally can when they come to our school since they are enrolled in work experience education. They learn everything about having a job, (from) taxes and resumes to interview skills."

Students in the program are exposed to a wide array of guest speakers from local companies and organizations, colleges and tech programs.

All of NU Tech's students are juniors and seniors, and there are just two instructors for no more than 45 students.

Osmond said camaraderie is a huge source of inspiration for students and teachers alike.

"There are a lot of students who come in with a little bit of a chip on their shoulder and they lose it real quick when they realize we really care about them and are there for them," Osmond explained. "We are very respectful (of) and care about our students, and that's what really gets them through."

The school boasts a high graduation rate. Many students, Osmond said, graduate early.

School staff keep close relationships with local professionals who offer work experience and instructors perform job visits, working with the employer and the student to ensure success.

Osmond adds that the school holds all students accountable for their actions, implementing a strict "three strike" rule.

"We're really focused on career and all of our students have a plan for when they leave high school," Osmond said. "It's really positive. We love our students."

Jennifer Nobles is a staff writer for The Union. She can be reached at jnobles@theunion.com or 530-477-4231.