Monks teach the six root delusions at Banner Community Guild | TheUnion.com

Monks teach the six root delusions at Banner Community Guild

Sam Corey
Staff Writer
Tibetan Monk Geshe Wangyal of the Gaden Shartse Monastery gathers his thoughts Wednesday at the Banner Community Grange in Grass Valley while giving an information session on the six delusions. Only monks with the title of Geshe are allowed to teach others after three years of debating with other monks.
Elias Funez/efunez@theunion.com

Know & Go

Where: Banner Community Guild Hall at 12629 McCourtney Road

Saturday

10 a.m. Family Art Event

3 p.m. Teaching Climate Change and the Six Root Delusions

7 p.m. Cultural Event (chant, debate, slide show, tea ceremony)

Sunday

3 p.m. Chey Drol (removing obstacles) group healing

Monday

Noon - Noon Tibet Radio Hour on KVMR-FM, Geshe la and Shanu

Wednesday

7 p.m. Teaching Climate Change and the Six Root Delusions

Friday

7 p.m. Dinner and a movie with the Monks (the monks will be making dinner)

March 9

10 a.m. Medicine Buddha Empowerment

3 p.m. Closing Ceremony

Buddhists waited in the Banner Community Guild room in their usual multicolored robes. Drawings of Buddhas and gods lined the back wall, the most notable image being a photograph of the Dalai Lama in the center.

It’s the second week of community events for the Buddhist monks, and on Wednesday the discussion was about the six root delusions. One Tibetan monk, Geshe Wangyal, spoke in his native language, while two others translated.

The focus was to teach interested listeners about Buddhism. Specifically, the monks taught the roots of suffering, and how to liberate oneself from them.

An example of these delusions arise in the form of a pig, rooster and snake, which represent ignorance, desire and attachment, and anger. None of these ideas, importantly, are integral to our natural state, according to Wangyal.

Home away from home

Tibetan Monks like Shadu Bodh who came to the Banner Community Guild enjoys Nevada County, and teaching local residents how to end their suffering, and reach enlightenment.

“This is the best camp,” said Bodh who noted that although the monks travel around the country, Nevada County is special because they have been coming here since the 90s.

“Normally we go to every place,” said Bodh. “We have been serving for 21 months. We have been to different cities, different schools, different temples.”

The Sierra Friends of Tibet decorated the Banner Community Guild specifically for the monks and attendees. Binders of photos from past events, fliers, and packets of information on the Tibetan monks were organized on tables.

The ever-popular sand mandala was separated by a thin barricade, light beams illuminating the colors from above. Donations jars were scattered on most tables, often accompanied by food or books about Buddhism and Tibet. All of the priced objects — blankets, drawings and robes — were made by Tibetan refugees from India, according to Sierra Friends of Tibet founder, Joseph Guida.

Another week

The monks have one more week in Nevada County where they will be focused on doing more sand paintings. Before they leave, the monks will destroy the painting and give its parts to community members. Bodh says this is meant to physically represent the concept of transience.

“Each and everything doesn’t stay forever,” said the monk. The sentiment was highlighted at the event.

The goal of Buddhism, as the speaker noted on Wednesday night, is to avoid the six root delusions, and to have all things come to an end. In this sense, he said, people should not desire reincarnation after death, but rather, to die peacefully and conclusively.

You can contact Sam Corey at (530) 477-4219 or by email at scorey@theunion.com.


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