Grass Valley family shelter may close due to loss of $170,000 | TheUnion.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Grass Valley family shelter may close due to loss of $170,000

The Salvation Army's facility on Alta Street. Photo by Dave Brooksher.

For the past several years, the Salvation Army’s Grass Valley Corps has relied on an Emergency Solutions Grant to operate The Booth Family Center.

It serves roughly 25 families a year, but workers say they may have to shut the shelter down in the coming months due to funding problems.

“The Booth family shelter is a homeless shelter specifically for families,” said Sara Eastberg, the Salvation Army employee who oversees the facility. “It’s an emergency shelter, and families can only stay 180 days per year.”



While there, families can access resources intended to help them avoid homelessness in the future. It’s a clean and sober living facility where residents meet with counselors and caseworkers on a regular basis. Health and parenting classes are also available.

“Families find permanent housing and solutions, and they don’t return to homelessness in their lifetimes because of the services they receive in the shelter.”
Sara Eastberg
Salvation Army employee

“One of the main goals for getting them into the shelter is establishing routines for the family so they can apply for jobs, maintain sobriety or anything that furthers that family and gives them a broader base so that they can maintain permanent housing should they get it,” Eastberg said.




This year, there was more competition for the Emergency Solutions Grant that Eastberg relied on. However, and there was less funding available. That $170,000 went elsewhere, and that could mean serious consequences for local families — many of whom are on a wait list to take advantage of the shelter’s services.

“If we don’t have another source of funding … we could shut down,” said Lt. Sid Salcido, general manager and commanding officer of the Salvation Army’s Grass Valley Corps.

They could also be forced to shut down the homelessness prevention program, which offers rental assistance to families facing eviction.

To keep these programs going, the Salvation Army’s Grass Valley Corps is seeking any support from the community. They’re also looking for other grant opportunities and ongoing institutional support.

“We want the community to know that good things happen out there,” Eastberg said.

“Families find permanent housing and solutions, and they don’t return to homelessness in their lifetimes because of the services they receive in the shelter,” she added. “And it would be a shame to see that go away.”

The Salvation Army’s Grass Valley Corps can be reached by phone at 530-274-3500.

To contact Staff Writer Dave Brooksher, email dbrooksher@theunion.com or call 530-477-4230.


Support Local Journalism


Support Local Journalism

Readers around Grass Valley and Nevada County make The Union’s work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Your donation will help us continue to cover COVID-19 and our other vital local news.

 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User