End of week could bring heat wave to Nevada County | TheUnion.com

End of week could bring heat wave to Nevada County

The pleasant temperatures enjoyed by Nevada County residents during the Father's Day weekend could soon be a distant memory, with excessive heat being predicted starting Friday.

High pressure will build across Northern California this week, continuing into the weekend, the National Weather Service said in a press release. High temperatures are expected Friday and into the weekend.

The weather service is warning of an increase in heat-related illnesses for those exposed to prolonged outdoor heat, especially the elderly, children and other sensitive groups. Potential impacts from the heat include heat stress to livestock with limited relief from heat overnight.

Fire danger will also be heightened, the weather service said. North winds on Saturday will increase the potential for fire starts and spread. North wind gusts up to 20 mph and relative humidity of 10 to 15 percent is predicted for Saturday.

Valley temperatures are expected to top the 100 degree mark Friday, and reach 102 to 104 degrees in some areas including Marysville Saturday. Overnight temperatures in those areas will not dip much, possibly only down to 65 to 70 degrees in many locations.

Nevada County will escape triple digits, however. The weather service is predicting a high of 94 degrees for Friday in Grass Valley, dropping to 64 overnight.

Recommended Stories For You

Saturday is forecasted to be sunny with a high near 96 in Grass Valley, climbing to 99 degrees in lower elevations such as Penn Valley. Temperatures then will start to drop, with a high of 94 degrees predicted for Sunday and 88 degrees on Monday in Grass Valley.

With the jump in temperatures, more people will be venturing to the river — and will be at more risk for drowning, PG&E warned in a recent release. California's rivers are full and running high, fast and cold, and higher water levels can cover obstacles below the surface. Debris, trees and rocks combined with cold, swift water create treacherous conditions for all recreationists — waders, swimmers, paddlers, anglers and even hikers juts looking to cool off at the water's edge.

Contact reporter Liz Kellar at 530-477-4236 or by email at lizk@theunion.com.

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.