Bear Yuba Land Trust executive director to step down | TheUnion.com

Bear Yuba Land Trust executive director to step down

Submitted to The Union

Bear Yuba Land Trust Executive Director Marty Coleman-Hunt is stepping down after more than a decade at the helm.

For 11 years, Coleman-Hunt led the organization as the executive director after serving on the board of directors as secretary and fundraising chair for two years. Under her leadership, the organization became accredited by the Land Trust Accreditation Commission, grew its land conservation footprint by nearly 10,000 acres and expanded a trail program from four to 32 miles.

Today, the land trust owns 10 public nature preserves and manages 28 conservation easements in Nevada, Sierra and Yuba counties, from the crest of the Sierra Nevada to the valley floor.

"I am honored to have been part of this journey with the Land Trust for the last 13 years," said Coleman-Hunt. "With a new strategic plan in place, I feel confident BYLT's strong, creative and talented staff and board will take the organization to the next level."

In the fall of 2017, the land trust welcomed Erika Seward as development director. Seward spent the past decade in management roles within the corporate and non-profit sectors for ESPN, The Walt Disney Company, B4BC Foundation, SIMA Humanitarian Fund, and locally Bear Yuba Land Trust, KVMR and the Nevada City Film Festival.

She and Conservation Director Erin Tarr, now in her sixth year, will serve as acting co-executive directors as the organization undergoes a formal candidate selection process for the executive director. On Jan. 1, the land trust named long-time board member and supporter Fran Cole as president.

Recommended Stories For You

"We are so appreciative of what Marty has done for this organization and for our community. We wish her the best in her new ventures," said Cole. "This is an exciting transition time for a resilient and dedicated Land Trust team as we plan for growth, new programs and new leadership."

Coleman-Hunt will continue to support the land trust as she transitions from organizational management to a consulting role. She plans to continue to advocate for land conservation in the Sierra Nevada region and will continue serving as a commissioner for the Land Trust Alliance, a national conservation organization representing more than 1,700 land trusts across the United States.

Source: Bear Yuba Land Trust

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.