Arbor Day Foundation selects Tahoe National Forest for 2015 Trees in Memory and Trees in Celebration commemorative planting | TheUnion.com
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Arbor Day Foundation selects Tahoe National Forest for 2015 Trees in Memory and Trees in Celebration commemorative planting

The Arbor Day Foundation announced that it will work with on-the-ground partners to plant 608,000 trees in California’s Tahoe National Forest through the Trees in Memory and Trees in Celebration commemorative tree planting programs, in an effort to accelerate the development of mature forest habitat in areas that experienced moderate to very high burn severity during the 2013 American Fire.

Trees in Memory/Trees in Celebration is a commemorative program that honors friends and loved ones by planting a tree in their name. This year, each dollar donated through the program plants a tree in the Tahoe National Forest.

Located in the north central region of the Sierra Nevada Range in northeastern California, Tahoe National Forest encompasses more than 850,000 acres of public land.



In 2013, the American Fire burned roughly 27,440 acres, including 22,500 acres of National Forest System lands. The reforestation strategy includes the establishment of small (approximately 1 acre) “founder stands” intermixed in large seedless landscapes. The new tree stands would be strategically located for seed dispersal and efficient management.

“The Tahoe National Forest is very excited to partner with the Arbor Day Foundation to work together in restoring areas of the Forest affected by the 2013 American Fire. Partners are the key to accomplishing ecological restoration in the Sierra Nevada national forests.”Forest supervisor Tom Quinn

Replanting efforts will begin in April and include ponderosa pine, Jeffery pine, Douglas fir, sugar pine, and incense cedar tree varieties.




“The Tahoe National Forest is very excited to partner with the Arbor Day Foundation to work together in restoring areas of the Forest affected by the 2013 American Fire,” said Tom Quinn, forest supervisor. “Partners are the key to accomplishing ecological restoration in the Sierra Nevada national forests.”

The newly planted trees will help accelerate the development of mature forest habitat, which will benefit species such as California spotted owl and American marten. Many other species will benefit from the additional cover and forage as the newly planted trees mature to replace the stands that were lost during the American Fire. Tahoe National Forest provides habitat for nearly 400 species of wildlife that make their homes in the various forest ecosystems.


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