$5 million energy contract on Grass Valley City Council agenda | TheUnion.com
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$5 million energy contract on Grass Valley City Council agenda

Back in January, the Grass Valley City Council voted to move into the program-development phase of a multimillion dollar solar energy project with Chevron Energy Solutions. The numbers have changed, as has the name of the firm pitching the deal, but that project is coming back to the City Council Monday night.

According to the staff report, Chevron Energy Solutions was “transferred” to Opterra Energy Services while they were working on the agreement with the city.

It was originally billed as a $3.4 million expense that would upgrade municipal infrastructure while saving Grass Valley $5 million over the life of the new equipment, an estimated 30 years. Now, Opterra is pitching a $5 million deal that will save the city $7 million.



“It’s one of those things where it looks too good to be true,” said Mayor Dan Miller, back in January. “But if the savings are there and the benefits to the city are what we’re looking at, we’d be stupid not to do this.”

“It’s one of those things where it looks too good to be true. But if the savings are there and the benefits to the city are what we’re looking at, we’d be stupid not to do this.”
Mayor Dan Miller

The project description still includes three new solar array to power city facilities, one of which is a large-scale ground-mounted 769 kW system on city owned property off Slate Creek Road. The deal also provides energy-friendly upgrades to the municipal pool, replacement of the roof at City Hall, and a LED upgrade of city owned lighting fixtures and street lights.




The Department of Public Works is also seeking authorization for a sole source procurement deal on equipment for the city’s water and wastewater treatment plants. Tim Kiser, Public Works director, says standardization will allow the city to save time and money on repairs and reprogramming costs.

“The expense of reprogramming treatment plant software could be avoided or greatly reduced, which currently has to be done by software programing consultants each time the City does not replace equipment with the same manufacturer as the software identified equipment,” Kiser wrote.

Sourcing parts from the same manufacturer could also help avoid unanticipated problems during replacements or upgrades.

To contact Staff Writer Dave Brooksher, email dbrooksher@theunion.com or call 530-477-4230.


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