Lives Lived: Bettler Baldwin | TheUnion.com
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Lives Lived: Bettler Baldwin

Bettler Clifton Baldwin (Bud), 88, died peacefully Feb. 8 at home in Grass Valley. He was 88.

A memorial gathering will be held at a later date.

He was born Nov. 24, 1921, in Alameda, to Mark Hanna Baldwin and Beatrice Bettler Baldwin.



He married Marciela Kinney on Dec. 7, 1951, in Riverside.

Mr. Baldwin graduated from Hollywood High School in 1939 and was employed at Lockheed Aircraft in Burbank, until 1943. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a commissioned officer and pilot from 1943 through 1945.




He received a Bachelor of Science degree in landscape architecture in 1950 from the University of Southern California.

He was employed by Eckbo, Royston, and Williams Landscape Architects from 1950 to 1952. From 1952 until 1990 he was in a challenging, fulfilling private practice in Los Angeles.

Mr. Baldwin was a member of the American Society of Landscape Architects and of Alpha Rho Chi, a national architectural fraternity.

He enjoyed backpacking and fishing in the high Sierra Nevada mountains with his family, woodworking, photography, vegetable

gardening, as well as beautifying and maintaining his surroundings, especially his home.

Those who knew him will remember his integrity, versatility and imagination. They were also brightened by his delightful sense of humor.

A loving and devoted family man, Mr. Baldwin is survived by his wife of 58 years, Marciela; sons, Kenneth of Grants Pass, Ore., Quay (Anna) of Southwest Harbor, Maine, and Jay (Dayna) of Penn Valley; daughter, Cathryn Brace of Redding; eight grandchildren, Adrian, Hanna, Madeline and Cedric of Maine, Talon of Weed, and Connor, Casey and Ty of Penn Valley; three great-grandchildren; and sisters, Marion Grider of Camarillo, and Patricia Howard of Canoga Park, Calif.

Memorial contributions may be made to Hospice of the Foothills.

Arrangements are by Hooper and Weaver Mortuary, Nevada City.


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