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Happiness is a new book

“Mother-Daughter Wisdom” by Christiane Northrup, M.D. Dr. Northrup is one of today’s most trusted medical experts on women’s health. In her latest book, she explores the physical and psychological bond between mothers and daughters with her five facets of feminine power. It is a book for women of all ages. Regardless of whether they are mothers, all women are daughters.

“Kafka on the Shore” by Haruki Murakami. A surreal novel in which two seemingly unrelated stories collide and meld in a clever and compelling tale. From young runaway Kafka Tamura to Mr. Nakata who can talk to cats, Murakami weaves an eerie and sometimes disturbing and violent story that is beautifully written and stunning in its scope.

“California Uncovered: Stories for the 21st Century,” edited by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni, William Justice, and James Quay. In 2000, the California Council for the Humanities sponsored a statewide read of “The Grapes of Wrath.” This collection of stories and essays is their next choice for the book to be read and shared with all Californians. Included are classic authors such as Steinbeck and Jeffers and new favorites Hosseini and Masumoto. Nevada County Reads has ended, so join the all-California book club!



“Articles of War” by Nick Arvin. Eighteen-year-old Heck Wilson leaves his Iowa farm for the battlefields of Normandy. Heck is terrified and convinced that he is the unthinkable – a coward. With critical comparisons to “The Red Badge of Courage,” this novel of war is really a book of peace.

“The Narrows” by Michael Connelly. Connelly is one of the best mystery writers there is, taking his readers down a twisting road with lots of surprises. Retired Det. Harry Bosch has been called by the widow of an old friend, a former police detective tied to the notorious Poet case. As Bosch investigates, he is sucked deeper into the darkness that is The Poet.




“The Fabulous Fior -Over 100 Years in an Italian Kitchen” by Francine Brevetti. Locals Bob and Jinx Larive own the oldest Italian restaurant in the U.S. Following a fire, Fior d’Italia will be closed for a few months, but you can still get your fix for chicken cacciatore and risotto alla Milanese from this book. Part San Francisco history, part cookbook.

“The Confessions of Max Tivoli” by Andrew Sean Greer. Max Tivoli is aging backwards. Born looking like an old man, he is becoming young. Rejected by Alice Levy, the love of his life, he goes through life masquerading as the man and age he appears to be. This is a story of old San Francisco and of a passionate, but elusive, love.

“The Unmistakable Touch of Grace” by Cheryl Richardson. Richardson believes that every person and event we encounter has been put in our path to lead us to a more fulfilled life. Even the most difficult experience should be seen as a blessing in disguise. This is a story of how Richardson found grace in her life and how you can make your own life more meaningful, hopeful and complete.

“The Society of Others” by William Nicholson. A mixture of spy thriller and philosophical discourse, this is a thought-provoking novel about a young Englishman who wanders into a nightmarish country where books are considered dangerous. Fear and repression run rampant in a place not far removed from “Fahrenheit 451.”

“Zen Shorts” by Jon Muth. Stillwater, a giant panda, tells the most amazing stories to his young neighbors. A poor man gives gifts to a robber, a monk carries a burden a long way, and luck can never be predicted. These are short Zen stories filled with joy and love that shine with Muth’s lush, restful watercolors.

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Compiled by manager Alison Jones-Pomatto at The Book Seller, 107 Mill St., Grass Valley, 272-2131. Hours are 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Saturdays and 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sundays.


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