Grass Valley’s Video Library liquidation sale to begin March 5 | TheUnion.com
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Grass Valley’s Video Library liquidation sale to begin March 5

Sam Corey
Staff Writer

Video Library

2116 Nevada City Highway, Grass Valley

Noon to 8 p.m. daily

The plan is to sell everything off and close it down, possibly some time during the summer.

After 35 years of co-owning Video Library in Grass Valley, Jack Garrett and his wife and co-owner Libbie Garrett are giving it up to enter retirement.

The liquidation sale begins March 5, according to Garrett, who said the lease is up in July.

Having lived in Los Angeles and working in corporate America, Garrett, now 80, then preferred a quieter life in Nevada County and moved into the video store business.

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“I’ve enjoyed every day of it. It hasn’t been a business for me so much as it’s been a pleasure center.”— Jack GarrettVideo Library owner

“Back then, video stores were the thing,” said Garrett. Today, “The video business is a dying business,” he said, noting that he would sell it instead of closing down if someone offered a fair offer.

As time progressed, Garrett said he’s had to keep cutting the price of his films, as the streaming business has grown in popularity. Today, he said newer movies are halved in price, but that storefronts, and shopping centers, in general are being hurt.

“It’s not a phenomenon unique to video,” said Garrett.

Only one Blockbuster video store — in Bend, Oregon — remains open, according to the Washington Post. (According to a Blockbuster clerk at the location, the store is “pretty busy, especially on the weekends.”)

At its height, the company had about 60,000 employees and over 9,000 stores, according to a 2013 NPR report.

In Grass Valley, despite the challenges in the industry, Garrett said someone could still make “a damn nice living” if they were to take over Video Library, which has seven employees.

Garrett said over the years, he’s tried to prioritize customer satisfaction above all else.

“Customer service,” he said. “If you don’t give it, you don’t get it.”

The co-owner said he’ll mostly be spending time outdoors, going hiking, kayaking and traveling. He said he’s most enjoyed hanging out with customers and his employees.

“I’ve enjoyed every day of it,” he said. “It hasn’t been a business for me so much as it’s been a pleasure center.”

To contact Staff Writer Sam Corey email scorey@theunion.com or call 530-477-4219.


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