Bessie Minor Swift Foundation support local programs | TheUnion.com

Bessie Minor Swift Foundation support local programs

The Union staff

The Bessie Minor Swift Foundation, formed by the owners and founder of Swift Communications, awards grants to programs that promote literacy, reading and writing skills as well as programs that focus on languages, sciences and interdisciplinary areas.

Since 2008, more than $620,000 has been awarded to deserving organizations in the communities where Swift Communications conducts business.

According to a news release, the deadline for 2019 grant applications was Feb. 15 and more than 185 applications were received. The Foundation grant criteria calls for detail about the number of people who will be impacted by the organization’s project and how significant a role the Bessie Minor Swift Foundation will play in the program. Further, applicants must provide a complete description of the project including objectives and strategies to meet those objectives, explain how the project will be evaluated and submit a budget. Recipients will report on their results and insights from their program once the projects are completed.

“This year, applications were of exceptional quality and more than $83,156 has been awarded to 37 deserving organizations,” the news release states. “The Bessie Minor Swift Foundation thanks the many groups that took the time and energy to apply and encourages those that were not selected to submit applications in the future.”

Applications will be accepted again starting January 1, 2020 with a deadline of February 15, 2020. For more information, visit the Bessie Minor website at http://www.bessieminorswift.org.

Area programs receiving grant funding included:

Chicago Park Elementary School, Grass Valley, $3,000 — Watershed education in the form of a field experience followed by an aquatic biology lab. This project builds upon a previous successful watershed field and lab curriculum in a disadvantaged rural school. Students will receive hands-on, standards aligned watershed science instruction. Funds will provide a comprehensive program to 2nd through 5th grade students that includes instruction, educational materials, and teacher curriculum guides. . After a field trip and lab experiences, all students will write letters about their watershed and exchange letters with students from Clear Creek School.

Clear Creek Elementary School District, Grass Valley, $3,000 — Watershed education in the form of a field experience followed by an aquatic biology lab. This project builds upon a previous successful watershed field and lab curriculum in a disadvantaged rural school. Students will receive hands-on, standards aligned watershed science instruction. Funds will provide a comprehensive program to 2nd through 5th grade students that includes instruction, educational materials, and teacher curriculum guides. After a field trip and lab experiences, all students will write letters about their watershed and exchange letters with students from Chicago Park School.

Grass Valley Charter School Foundation, Grass Valley, $1,400 — The “STEAM on the Yuba” project will engage students across Nevada County by providing science and engineering tools and lessons to complete the 20-foot scale model of the Yuba River that was recently constructed in the Science Garden at Grass Valley Charter School. This project will add interactive STEAM features to the model. Funds will purchase Pelton Wheel Turbines with DC generators, an air compressor, books concerning hydropower, reusable kits for student-designed water wheels and other miscellaneous supplies.

Sierra Nevada Memorial Hospital Foundation, Grass Valley, $1,000 — The Read Me a Story program, which provides books to children in rural western Nevada County during eight well-child medical visits, age six months to five years. During each appointment, pediatricians speak with parents about early literacy and their child’s development; and provide educational materials and an age appropriate book in English or Spanish. Funds will provide books for approximately 200 children and materials for parents, including materials sharing the importance of limiting screen time for their young children.

California Heritage Indigenous Research Project, Nevada City, $3,000 — A project is to develop and teach six beginning Nisenan language classes. The classes will target Tribal youth but be accessible to Tribal members of any age who are beginning language learners. Advanced language students who currently work with a Linguist will serve as teachers. Funds will be used for consulting, program development costs, office equipment to prepare materials, printing, videography and printing. This program will invest in teaching the language of the Nisenan Tribe to children so that it might live into the future.


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