Murder suspect petitions for transfer from Napa | TheUnion.com
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Murder suspect petitions for transfer from Napa

Cody Feiler, who has been incarcerated at Napa State Hospital since 2012 after being found not guilty of the murder of James Turner by reason of insanity, is asking for a less restrictive placement.

Feiler has filed a petition for transfer to outpatient treatment, and the matter is set for a court trial on Nov. 15 in Nevada County Superior Court.

Nevada County District Attorney Cliff Newell said his office opposes the transfer.



“He does not meet any of the criteria for outpatient treatment, from our perspective,” he said. “We will be objecting to any change of custody status.”

Acing Public Defender Keri Klein stressed that any conditional release program authorized by the California Department of State Hospitals would involve intensive monitoring and support.




“It’s not like going to outpatient drug treatment,” Klein said. “Instead, it’s intensive treatment, support and monitoring in a non-hospital setting. I think it’s important that our community understands that a person who’s been found not guilty by reason of insanity, and who is later returned to a community through the conditional release program, is closely monitored to assure that they are doing what they need to do in order to assure public safety.”

Feiler was arrested after 75-year-old James Turner was found unconscious near the Alta Sierra Airport runway on Feb. 10, 2011. Turner sustained serious head trauma and died 12 days later.

Feiler was subsequently charged with homicide, assault with a deadly weapon and vandalism.

During a preliminary hearing into the evidence against Feiler, Nevada County Sheriff’s deputies testified that he rambled about hacking into Wikileaks, frog habitats, different dimensions and metaphysics.

Feiler told deputies he had gone to the airport to look for crystals, and had encountered Turner carrying a package that he believed belonged to him.

He said that he became frightened when Turner touched him, believing he was a creep sent by the government with a poison pill.

Feiler said he punched Turner in the face, knocking him down, then kicked him in the chest, and threw a large piece of wood at him.

Feiler told deputies he then went home, covering himself in hand lotion and gold glitter and trying to burn his beard off with an aerosol can and a candle.

In May 2012, he was ruled not guilty by reason of insanity, and was transported to Napa.

Newell said he still considers Feiler to be a danger to society, adding, “without a doubt, he’s a danger if he’s out.”

Klein disagreed, saying, “If you can treat someone and return them to a community so they can be a productive member of society, we should. We shouldn’t lock them up forever because of treatable mental illness.”

To contact Staff Writer Liz Kellar, email lkellar@theunion.com or call (530) 477-4229.


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