California Highway Patrol traffic stop uncovers drugs, weapons, burglary tools and clown mask | TheUnion.com
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California Highway Patrol traffic stop uncovers drugs, weapons, burglary tools and clown mask

Cory Goodrich-Fordyce in a 2015
Nevada County Sheriff Department |

Four people in a car pulled over by a California Highway Patrol officer all ended up going to jail after reportedly being found with drugs, weapons, burglary tools — and a clown mask.

An officer on patrol saw the silver Mitsubishi on McKnight Way by Highway 49 just before 2 a.m. Monday, and pulled it over on Dog Bar Road for having an obscured rear license plate, said CHP spokesman Greg Tassone.

The officer approached the vehicle and could both smell marijuana and see the packaged pot in the car, Tassone said.



As the occupants of the car shifted around, the officer reportedly also caught sight of a small handgun on the rear passenger seat.

All of the occupants were subsequently detained and removed from the car, and Grass valley Police officers and Nevada County Sheriff’s deputies responded to assist.




The driver, Amethyst Elizabeth Inez Neil, 25, had a small-caliber handgun on her, and was in possession of one pound of marijuana, Tassone said.

A search of the car reportedly uncovered drug paraphernalia, including a number of pipes, as well as suspected heroin and methamphetamine in what Tassone characterized as personal use amounts.

A clown mask was also found in the vehicle, he said.

Passenger Dylan Hart Walker, 21, reportedly had metal knuckles with a knife blade attached, a handgun with the serial number filed off, ammunition, a large number of shaved keys, and burglary tools.

Neil was booked into county jail on suspicion of carrying a concealed weapon and possessing drug paraphernalia, and was released on $6,000 bail.

Walker was arrested on suspicion of violating probation, possessing metal knuckles, possessing a controlled substance and drug paraphernalia, possessing a controlled substance while armed, possessing marijuana, being a felon in possession of a gun and ammunition, carrying a concealed weapon in a vehicle and altering a firearm, as well as two outstanding felony warrants. He was being held without bail.

Walker last made the pages of The Union in September 2015 after reportedly stealing tools from a charter school and then escaping and being detained a second time.

He was arrested on suspicion of being a felon in possession of ammunition, violating probation, driving on a suspended license, possessing stolen property, possessing drug paraphernalia, resisting arrest and providing a fake ID.

He subsequently pleaded no contest to possessing stolen property, being a felon in possession of ammunition and resisting arrest.

The other two passengers also were arrested.

James Robert Terry, 29, was booked into county jail on charges of violating probation, possessing burglary tools and drug paraphernalia, and carrying a concealed firearm. He was being held without bail.

Cory Goodrich-Fordyce, 26, was arrested on suspicion of violating probation, possessing drug paraphernalia, carrying a concealed firearm and altering a firearm.

He also was being held on a no-bail warrant.

Goodrich-Fordyce was arrested in October 2014, he was arrested in a vehicle that reportedly contained stolen items, burglary tools — and a Halloween mask of an old man. In that case, he was arrested on suspicion of criminal conspiracy, possession of burglary tools, and trespassing.

He was arrested again in April 2015 in connection with a burglary at Grass Valley Charter School and charged with being an ex-felon with a firearm, possessing a controlled substance, possessing a controlled substance while armed, possessing stolen property and violating probation. He pleaded no contest to the stolen property and gun charges and was sentenced to a year in jail.

To contact City Editor Liz Kellar, email lkellar@theunion.com or call 530-477-4229.


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