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Cool times: Lower temps to stay into next week

Nevada County experienced relatively lower temperatures on Tuesday, with the cooler weather resulting from a low pressure system that will likely keep temperatures down well into next week, according to the National Weather Service.

Temperatures hovered in the 90s for the previous two weeks in much of Nevada County, but Tuesday marked a shift in this pattern, with a high of just 86 and a low of 69.

FILE PHOTO — California Poppies and Blue Dicks blossom along the Buttermilk Bend Trail near Penn Valley back in March 2021.
Photo: Elias Funez

It wasn’t an aberration. For the rest of this week, Nevada County will see high temperatures between 81 to 86, and lows of 60 to 69, according to The Union’s weather forecast.



This shift in temperature marks the arrival of a low pressure system from the north bringing cooler air to the county, with this new system expected to last at least until the middle of next week, said Cory Mueller, a meteorologist with the weather service.

The low pressure system replaces a high pressure “ridge” system that had previously been keeping temperatures in the 90s or higher in recent weeks, Mueller said.



A ridge is an elongated region of high pressure in the atmosphere, and is typically associated with warmer weather.

The ridge system in Nevada County has drifted off to the east, allowing the cooler weather from the low pressure system to settle in over the county, Mueller said.

This new pressure system is also bringing downslope winds from the northeast, and county residents could see a noticeable uptick in wind as soon as last night or today, with these winds in turn bringing drier weather, he added.

While smoke from numerous regional fires, especially the Dixie Fire, can in theory cause lower temperatures in the county, as smoke clouds can block sunlight, it does not appear as though the drop in temperatures this week is primarily the result of smoke, Muller said.

“Smoke can have impacts on temperatures…it can hold the temperature down, but in comparing (Monday) to (Tuesday) … it would be inaccurate to say that the temperatures fell just because it was smoky,” the meteorologist said.

Temperatures could start to rise again by the middle of next week, or more likely toward the end of next week, as the current low pressure system is expected to dissipate around that time.

Stephen Wyer is a staff writer with The Union. He can be reached at swyer@theunion.com


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