Camptonville Historical Society to preserve stories through artifacts | TheUnion.com

Camptonville Historical Society to preserve stories through artifacts

Sam Corey
Staff Writer

Leland Pauly's uncl driving his stage route in the 1930s.
Submitted by Stephanie Korney

KNOW & GO

WHEN: 1 p.m., Sunday, April 7

WHERE: Camptonville Community Center, 15333 Cleveland Ave., Camptonville

INFO: www.camptonvillehistoricalsociety.org

After two elders died in Camptonville, Stephanie Korney felt something should be done.

The president of the Camptonville Historical Society wanted to honor Leland Pauly, the unofficial town historian and namesake of the community center’s museum, and Lois Butz, who was a part of the founding of the historical society.

“They shared a lot of information for us and then they were gone,” said Korney.

On April 7, the Camptonville Historical Society is inviting community residents to bring in presentations, photographs and objects to share their stories at the Leland K. Pauly Museum in the Camptonville Community Center.

Korney hopes these things will accurately depict and preserve stories of Camptonville. While the objects won’t stay in the museum, photos of them and their corresponding stories will be preserved at the community center and online.

Korney said examples of possible objects include snowshoes for horses or pack saddles from pack -train days.

FAR AWAY INFLUENCES

Back in August when Korney applied for a California Humanities grant to open an exhibit for physical Camptonville items, she drew on two influences. The Smithsonian’s 101 Objects that Made America and the British Museum’s A History of the World in 100 Objects.

“What a concept to try to tell the history of the world in a finite number of objects,” she said.

In today’s age, where people are online and governed by algorithms and pixels, Korney said she wanted better representation of Camptonville during a time when the internet wasn’t all-encompassing.

The historical society president wants the event to be a show-and-tell for community residents.

“In a world of virtual experiences,” she said, “this project will be deeply rooted in actual objects.”

Contact Sam Corey at (530) 477-4219 or at scorey@theunion.com.

Correction: The original story incorrectly referenced Leland Pauly’s heritage. Pauly was the namesake of the Camptonville Community Center museum.

Clarification: Lois Butz’s family lived in Celestial Valley.


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