Thymes, they are a changin’: Summer Thyme’s Bakery and Deli closed after Sunday | TheUnion.com

Thymes, they are a changin’: Summer Thyme’s Bakery and Deli closed after Sunday

Sam Corey
Staff Writer
Summer Thyme's Bakery and Deli closed Sunday. Customers lined up to enjoy one last meal at the restaurant.
Sam Corey/scorey@theunion.com.

When he was starting out as a jazz harpist, Motoshi Kosako first came to play Sundays at Summer Thyme’s Bakery and Deli.

His goal was to introduce his music to the community, and test run certain melodies, using the space to try out new ideas.

That was around 2007, he said. Yesterday, Kosako was playing there again — for the last time.

Co-owner Amy Cooke decided to close Summer Thyme’s at the end of Sunday due to health reasons. The co-owner, who bought the business with Chamba Cooke in 2008, said she will let people know if Summer Thyme’s has plans to reopen in a different location, and provide updates as to what will happen to the building, which has been up for sale since March.

Customer Morgan Corey first came to Summer Thyme’s after ending what he categorized as an abusive relationship. The staff made him feel at home, he said, as if he was walking onto the set of “Cheers.”

“The people were just so special, so open and warm,” he said. “It reminded me of what community was.”

Hannah Acosta had endured a similar experience. While previously working at the bakery, she arrived late one day due relationship issues. Cooke listened to Acosta’s story, accepted her and allowed her to remain on staff.

“They love you and support you,” said Acosta. “They make you believe you can do anything.”

With help from staff and the owners, Acosta was able to start her own gymnasium in Grass Valley. Now that Summer Thymes is closing, she feels it will open a vacuum where activity and bonding had once been.

“It’s going to be a hole in the community,” she said.

Sunday, Amy Cooke compared the final day of business at the bakery to a wake, allowing people to say their good byes and enjoy one final meal.

“It’s really been a privilege,” said Amy Cooke, her eyes red, straining from the tears. She noted the weightiness of the decision.

“Eventually, you have to put the oxygen mask on yourself.”

Contact Sam Corey at 530-477-4219 or at scorey@theunion.com.


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.