Tech Tips: Freeze rows or columns in Excel and deciphering iOS 11 after the upgrade | TheUnion.com

Tech Tips: Freeze rows or columns in Excel and deciphering iOS 11 after the upgrade

Doug Behl and Ken Getz
Columnists

I use Excel to track lists of things, and sometimes the list is longer than I can view on screen. When I scroll up to look at the lower rows, I lose the header information, and I can't tell which column is which. This seems like a common problem. Is there a simple solution?

You're right — this is really bothersome. You're entering data into a spreadsheet, and when you scroll down to the row you want to enter data in, the headings scroll of the screen and you can't tell which column is which.

The same thing can happen if you have row headers on the left side of the spreadsheet — as you scroll to the right to add more data, the information in the left-most column scrolls off the left edge of the screen, so you can't see the row headers either.

Luckily, everyone struggles with this same problem, and Excel makes it easy to work around the physical problem of screen real estate by providing its Freeze Rows/Columns feature. You can freeze one or more rows or columns so that they don't scroll with the rest of the content of the spreadsheet.

To freeze the top row or left column, go to the View tab, click the Freeze Panes button, then select either the Freeze Top Row or Freeze First Column button.

To unfreeze the top row or left column once you've frozen it, go to the View tab, and this time, click the Unfreeze Panes button.

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That's it! It's easy to never notice this functionality, but it certainly makes it easier to work with Excel and its spreadsheets.

Deciphering iOS 11 after the upgrade

I recently upgrade my iPad to iOS 11, and I'm totally flummoxed by all the new features and options and apps. I've looked online, but can't really find any help that makes sense to me. Is there some place I can look for beginner help with iOS 11?

It's true: There are a lot of new features and apps in iOS 11, from the new dock to a bunch of improved built-in apps.

You can search online for help, or ask a friend, but Apple has tried to make this upgrade easier by supplying a bunch of YouTube videos that each explain a single feature. We've watched several of these new videos, and they're really excellent.

In the YouTube app, or on their website, search for the Apple Support channel. (We just did the search, and here's the URL we found: https://goo.gl/kUcqu7).

At this point, there are around 10 videos specifically for the iPad, with another set for iPhone. Apple is constantly updating this set of videos, and really, they're helpful.

Of course, if you also just search on YouTube for information on iOS 11, you'll find a ton of videos, some more helpful than others. We really like the Apple Support channel, as its videos are uniformly high quality, simple to understand, and short and sweet. Check them out to help get a "leg up" with iOS 11.

Doug Behl and Ken Getz spent years answering technical questions in private, and are minimizing the questions by pre-emptively publishing the answers. Hear Doug and Ken's tech tips on KNCO radio weekdays at around 8:21 a.m. and 5:38 p.m.; find full write-ups including links to the products they mention at http://blog.techtipguys.com. Submit your own technical questions to questions@techtipguys.com.