Meet your merchant: Dr. Tiffany Chan to take over her parents’ 40-year practice in Grass Valley | TheUnion.com

Meet your merchant: Dr. Tiffany Chan to take over her parents’ 40-year practice in Grass Valley

Doctors of optometry Lisa Moon and her daughter, Tiffany Chan, at their Grass Valley office. Tiffany Chan will be taking over her parents' practice beginning Jan. 1. The name will be changed to Chan Family Vision Care.
Cory Fisher/Cory@theunion.com

Chan Family Vision Care

Formerly Drs. Chan, Moon, & Associates

360 Sierra College Dr., Ste. 100, Grass Valley

Phone: 530-273-3190

Website: https://www.drschanandmoon.com

The look of pride in the eyes of Dr. Lisa Moon was unmistakable Tuesday as she discussed her daughter’s accomplishments and future plans.

On Jan. 1, Dr. Tiffany Chan, who is a doctor of optometry just like both of her parents, will take over the 40-year Grass Valley family practice of Drs. Chan, Moon, & Associates. With her mother now retired and her father, Jerry Chan, staying on part time, “Dr. Tiffany” will take the helm with the support of associates Dr. Jason Allgeier and Dr. Curtis Meredith.

Last week, Moon and her daughter showed off the draft of the new sign scheduled in January to go up signifying the practice’s new name — “Chan Family Vision Care.”

“It would have been misleading to leave my mother’s last name in the practice, but I wanted to somehow acknowledge her,” said Tiffany. “So we made the letter ‘C’ in the shape of a moon.”

Tiffany Chan brings a wealth of experience and expertise to the practice. As a child, she often helped around her parents’ office, but that turned out to be the least of it.

After earning her bachelor of science degree at the University of California, Davis she went on to earn her doctor of optometry degree at the University of California, Berkeley. During her residency, she focused on primary care optometry, low-vision rehabilitation and vision therapy at The Northport Veterans Affairs Medical Center at the State University of New York’s College of Optometry. She then landed a Lions Vision Rehabilitation Fellowship at Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute in Baltimore, Maryland, where she stayed for six years. This led her into a faculty position, as well as clinical research, patient care and lecturing internationally.

She still remains active in academia and teaching ophthalmology residents as the section chief of the Low Vision Service at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco. Additionally, she participates in clinical research at the Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute in San Francisco, as well as research projects with colleagues at UCLA, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine and New England College of Optometry in Boston.

“Don’t forget that she’s published too,” said Moon, with a laugh and a glance at her daughter.

‘A MIX OF MOM & DAD’

Tiffany Chan’s interest in low-vision rehabilitation is an area of medicine she hopes to integrate into her own new practice — a cutting-edge field few are aware of, she said. She and the associate doctors of Chan Family Vision Care plan to continue offering a full range of services including routine vision care, contact lens fitting, evaluation and management of glaucoma, dry eye disease and retinal conditions, emergency medical eye care, and low vision services for patients with chronic vision impairment.

Tiffany Chan’s Johns Hopkins fellowship was cut unexpectedly short three years ago when her mother, Dr. Lisa Moon, was forced to take a medical leave due to a sudden ruptured cerebral aneurysm, which caused a subarachnoid hemorrhage, a life-threatening type of stroke.

Tiffany flew home to care for her mother and help her father with the practice. Today, Moon is one of the lucky few to recover, said Chan, but she is now retired. Her father is now looking forward to working part-time, fishing, attending Cal basketball games and helping to care for his eldest daughter’s children, who live in Davis.

“I’m a mix of my mom and dad,” said Chan. “It’s hard to put in to words — I feel so fortunate to be a part of what my parents have built, and to carry on what they started. They really instilled in me the important values of making patients a priority and caring for our staff. One of our assistants has been with us for 36 years.”

“I’m so proud of my daughter,” said Moon. “I can’t think of a better person to turn the practice over to. Like me, she loves her patients and treats them like family. I knew as a baby that she would be something special. I sensed it in my heart.”

To contact Staff Writer Cory Fisher, email her at Cory@theunion.com.


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