Brad Prowse: 100 years ago in Nevada County | TheUnion.com

Brad Prowse: 100 years ago in Nevada County

Brad Prowse
Columnist

The Union photo/John Hart

From the pages of The Union newspaper in July 1918:

A sham battle at Cashins field will be featured at the 4th of July celebration including the Home Guard Companies of Grass Valley, Nevada City and Colfax.

All auto owners are invited to enter the 4th parade.

A hospital ship is a U-Boat victim — sunk off Irish coast. Only 24 of 250 saved.

Twenty-six local men leave for the service in two days.

July was cool with trace rains at beginning, middle, and end of the month.

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N. W. Ince and Miss Bennetts lost control of their machine in front of J. M. Foley's candy store, knocking down a post.

Two local men became dentists — Dr. Elmer Berryman and Dr. Carl King.

A million Americans now face the Hun in Europe.

Boys have been breaking the electric light globes in Olympic park. The sheriff is looking for the offenders.

Germany demands Finland form a monarchy, which Germany will control.

Who was the first white child born in Grass Valley? Chamber of Commerce wants to know.

U.S. guns belch death at desperate Hun counter attack. French gain a half mile on a two mile front.

Al Jennings, one time train robber, appears in a movie at the Auditorium.

Civil war pensioners will receive an increase to $30 per month.

A chimney fire at Schreiver's restaurant was quickly extinguished by the fire truck.

There's hard fighting along the Somme.

Jack Delbridge of Grass Valley is now 'over there' in France.

Patriotism was at a white heat at the 4th of July celebration as civilization's defenders were added in brilliant address ringing with patriotic sentiments.

The California Adjutant-General forbids uniformed members of the Home Guard from entering an establishment where liquor is sold.

Taylor's Foundry and Engineering sold 12 cars in June — the Buick agency sold 3.

Harry Gallagher of Nevada City was made a lieutenant in the dental corp.

Four local boys make sergeant; Will Mitchell, Carl Hooper, Mel Wasley and Herbert Hamm.

Smashing blow delivered by French on Hun lines.

Marshal Northway arrested William Thomas of Brighton Street for using water out of hours.

A German air raid on a Belgium hospital kills 50 girls preparing bandages.

A forest fire extends from the head of Little Greenhorn to the foot of Banner.

Leroy Rowett Peard, 3 week-old son of William Peard, died at the family home from whooping cough.

Mrs. Fred Handson, 30, of Camptonville died under anesthetic during the fourth operation on her limb.

Locals better get their fuel in early this year—woodcutters are scarce.

A German peace offensive is under way — Kaiser said to be ready to give up Belgium.

Fire destroys 500 cords of wood at Hobart Mills.

Someone is turning in false fire alarms at the Church and Chapel Street box—he should spend time in county jail.

A mighty German offensive is held to small gains — terrible battle along a 60 mile front.

The old city jail behind the new hotel is almost demolished—only the cells remain.

Retail food prices have increased 63 percent in the last 5 years.

An auto-truck owned by G. Y. Get smashed into another machine on the Rough & Ready road — drivers and machines pretty well banged up.

Aviator Lt. Quentin Roosevelt, the youngest son of the Ex-president, is reported killed in France.

Clifford Murry, raised by John Coughlin of Columbia Hill, has been wounded in France.

Teutonic hoards swept back by combined American/French offensive.

Word has been received that Quentin Roosevelt may be a prisoner of the Germans.

To conserve energy, electric signs and such must be turned off.

Germans retreat over Marne.

Sun, rain or snow, William Pascoe, 71, of Dutch Flat, carries the mail on his back, one mile, twice a day, between the SP station and town. The packs occasionally weigh 130 pounds. He receives $17.50 a month for his efforts.

The first white child born here was Selma Bice, born August 15th, 1853, on Lower Main Street. Miners showered mother and child with gold dust and nuggets. Selma died in 1883.

American Indians fighting in France were fired on by Germans while crossing a river. The Indians submerged, swam downstream and surfaced to cover themselves with mud and river foliage and escaped detection.

The local draft board has been asked to send one colored man to Camp Lewis. Walter 'Gus' Thompson, the first colored man from this county to be drafted, has been sent.

Germans slow Allied drive by making rear guard counter-attacks.

Regirl Pallidini has three sons serving their country.

The Bret Harte will be the name of the new Grass Valley hotel. It was submitted by Mrs. Irvin Carson.

Germans claim American troops fight well but tend to be reckless and lose more men than other Allied armies.

Apricot and peach pits are being collected — are used in making gas masks.

A letter writer protests the naming of the new hotel after Bret Harte — said Harte was against just such commercial ventures as the hotel represents.

Brad Prowse, a longtime columnist for The Union, died in 2014. Prior to his death, Prowse researched and wrote several years' worth of "100 years ago in Nevada County," which can also be found at TheUnion.com.

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