‘A great place to live’: Officials, residents praise new Penn Valley senior housing complex | TheUnion.com
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‘A great place to live’: Officials, residents praise new Penn Valley senior housing complex

Lone Oak Senior Apartments residents Randy Witt, left, and neighbor Susan Munro were in attendance at Tuesday’s ribbon cutting ceremony off Broken Oak Court in Penn Valley. The housing authority complex is the first of its kind in western Nevada County.
Photo: Elias Funez

Fulfilling of vision of a long sought need, the Lone Oak Senior Apartments complex celebrated a ribbon cutting Tuesday.

The Lone Oak Senior Apartments in Penn Valley is one of a handful of high density affordable housing projects that are currently being pursued by the county.
Photo: Elias Funez

“Lone Oak Senior Housing is a demonstration of how committed the CEO and (Board of Supervisors) is to affordable housing,” said Gus Becerra, executive director of the Regional Housing Authority. “Every time we struck out, Nevada County leveraged a way to attain more funding.”

Supervisor Dan Miller praised the housing project.



“It’s a great compliment to (the Regional Housing Authority) and the partnership with Mike Dent and the CEO’s office,” he said. “This is a great time to provide more housing to a vulnerable population.”

Dent, county director of Housing, said the county will have another 150 units in Grass Valley, Nevada City and Truckee ready for occupancy by summer 2023 or sooner.



“To find housing for 31 seniors is a huge win for everybody in the county,” he said.

Beccerra said there is no one fixed rental rate. Tenants pay 30% of their income. And they can earn up to 60% of the regional area medium income, $37,548 for Grass Valley, to qualify.

“And there is no minimum income,” he added. “Somebody on Social Security qualifies — exactly who we want to target. This is appropriate for Penn Valley because there is a shortage of housing, particularly affordable housing.”

Susan Munro is a tenant who moved to Lone Oak on July 6 from Colfax. She described her apartment as spacious and staff as courteous. One of the reasons she moved is because she has impaired vision and she needed a neighborhood with nearby conveniences.

“The bus service, Gold Country Stage, allows you to make appointments for transit to a doctor’s office and then they bring you back,” said Munro. “And the bus service accommodates those who have mobility issues. It’s a great place to live.”

The project’s architect is Pacific Architecture, Inc. The co-development partner is Pacific West Communities, Inc.

Nevada County Supervisor Sue Hoek addresses those in attendance at the ribbon cutting ceremony. Residents have already moved into the building.
Photo: Elias Funez

CHALLENGES

While the topography of the apartments is relatively flat, making construction fairly smooth, there was a series of delays with PG&E having higher priorities during the wildfire season.

Other challenges included supply chain delays of building material owing to the pandemic. And though lumber prices spiked soon after the onset of COVID-19, the project managers signed a contract before the virus spread to the U.S. and averted the escalated expenses of a key component. However, appliances proved difficult to obtain.

Lone Oak includes a number of amenities. There is a dog park adjacent to the building and at the rear, and a community garden with raised planters. There is also a multipurpose room for meetings and dining, as well as a small fitness room with a treadmill and various exercise equipment. In addition, seniors have a computer lab and laundry room. The complex is also Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant and fully air conditioned.

The 31 units at 10584 Broken Oak Court in Penn Valley had a total cost of $10.8 million. All units have signed tenants or occupancy, with many of the tenants moving in during July. The building is 22,023 square feet and is comprised of one- and two-bedroom units. One bedroom apartments are 607 square feet, and two bedrooms are 805 square feet.

The project’s principal co-development partners were the Regional Housing Authority, including Nevada, Yuba, Sutter and Colusa counties, and the Nevada County Housing and Community Services Department.

William Roller is a staff writer with The Union. He can be reached at wroller@theunion.com


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