A deal for the ages: Former Grass Valley resident selling his home, donating most of the money to climate change activism | TheUnion.com

A deal for the ages: Former Grass Valley resident selling his home, donating most of the money to climate change activism

Sam Corey
Staff Writer
Gary Krane plans to give most of the proceeds from his home sale in Grass Valley to climate activist organizations.
Photo submitted by Gary Krane

When a wedding is celebrated, the couple generally expects gifts.

But that wasn’t the case for Gary Krane and his fiancé.

It was the late ’90s and Krane, a former investigative journalist and current social justice activist, asked guests to send money to just causes rather than provide gifts to the soon-to-be married couple.

Today, with his home on the market in Grass Valley and a climate crisis taking effect, Krane said he is again doing something similar.

Profits of the pending sale of his South County home will go toward activist organizations trying to combat climate change, said Krane. The activist wants to take a significant portion of the profit from the sale of his $326,000 home near Lime Kiln Road, and invest in organizations like Extinction Rebellion, Greenpeace, the Sierra Club and the Sunrise Movement.

“There’s so little time to save the planet and I’m over 70,” said Krane, who said he also wants to help undo America’s “grotesque wealth inequality.”

Krane is currently living in Oaxaca, Mexico, and has been focused on a project called winwisely.org to foster activism, working to galvanize millions of people to participate in direct action against companies that further climate change and the representatives who endorse them. Krane said he specifically wants to target people willing to throw themselves in jail to increase pressure on corrupted businesses and politicians to reform their policies.

Social change

Sue Caplan, the real estate agent selling Krane’s home, said she’s never worked with anyone willing to donate cash to nonprofits from their home sale — particularly while they are still alive. This is especially surprising, she said, as the plan stems from a middle-class individual rather than a wealthy philanthropist.

“It’s a joy to work with someone that still cares about our world,” Caplan said.

But it’s not just money Krane has donated. It’s also time.

The activist said he’s been arrested on many occasions in his attempts to create social change, most recently in Washington D.C. while trying to prevent Republicans from repealing the Affordable Care Act. While in Oaxaca, Krane became a part of Extinction Rebellion’s global team. The organization has been part of civil disobedience campaigns urging representatives to take more responsibility on climate change.

Prior to throwing his weight behind activism, Krane’s work as a journalist helped create Losing Control, a 60-minute PBS special about the threat of nuclear war. Krane said he was nominated for a George Polk Award for his past work.

It’s the activist’s hope that his initiative spreads, nudging more individuals to donate their money and time to causes trying to prevent Earth’s catastrophic collapse.

Caplan herself said she will likely do something similar, taking a page out of Krane’s playbook, when she officially sells his home.

“Gary can inspire all of us to share the wealth,” she said.

Contact Sam Corey at 530-477-4219 or at scorey@theunion.com.


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