Fungi diversity hike at Yuba Rim Trail | TheUnion.com

Fungi diversity hike at Yuba Rim Trail

Submitted to The Union

KNOW & GO

WHAT: California Native Plant Society & Bear Yuba Land Trust: Fungi Diversity Hike at Yuba Rim Trail

WHEN: Saturday, Feb. 1, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., rain or shine

WHERE: Yuba Rim Trailhead is located on Marysville Rd, about 3/4 miles west of the Bullard’s Bar dam and about 5 miles east of Dobbins. Parking is across the street from the quarry. Look for the big sign.

COST: Free, suggested donation $5

BRING: Water, snacks, weather gear, especially footwear since the trail is likely to be muddy. Also suggested are a pocketknife, hand lens, a notebook, a cell phone with the iNaturalist app installed.

INFO: www.bylt.org

A new immersive educational hiking series led by the Redbud Chapter of the California Native Plant Society (CNPS) with support from the Bear Yuba Land Trust (BYLT), aims to shed light on the local year-round botanical phenomena that occurs right beneath our noses. From February through May, the two organizations will offer almost weekly field trips to various locales in western Placer and Nevada Counties. The hikes will cover a variety of botanical topics that were selected to follow the seasonal development of our various ecosystems. Early hikes will concentrate on lower elevations and early spring plant phenomena, and will ramp up into the wildflower season.

The Fungi Diversity Hike at Yuba Rim Trail on Saturday, Feb. 1, will tackle issues facing native fungi, ethics, safety, and identification, and highlight the relationships between plants and fungi from decomposition to the mycorrhizal network. Located on Rice’s Crossing North Preserve and overlooking the confluence of the Middle Yuba River and North Yuba River, the Yuba Rim trail is a fungal hot spot due to a high diversity of ecotypes, or a distinct form or race of a plant or animal species occupying a particular habitat. Ponderosa Pine stands, Oak woodlands, mixed conifer forests, Manzanita/Ceanothus chaparral, and last but not least, the Tanoak/Madrone complex make the Bullard’s Bar area a unique enclave of fungal species.

“I would like our participants to grow their understanding of our local ecosystem and the foundational role that plants play in those ecosystems. I want to share a passion and love for our unique local environs and communities,” explains series guide Shane Hanofee. “And that plant advocacy is the logical first step in fighting ecological problems like climate change and habitat loss and everyone can help to those ends, no particular expertise required. Plants can help make the world a better place but we need a robust community of advocates to speak up for the voiceless.”

Hanofee, a California certified Naturalist and Master Gardener, is also a passionate amateur botanist and mycologist devoted to learning about and caring for the plants and fungi of California and more specifically, Nevada and Placer counties. He began volunteering for BYLT in the spring of 2018 writing up species lists for the various BYLT properties, which then led to his involvement with the BYLT Bioblitz series in 2019 and aid in planning the native nursery at the BYLT office. It was his idea to approach CNPS with the field trip plan and suggested partnering with BYLT to encourage the community to head out into nature on a regular basis by utilizing local trails.

“Plants can help make the world a better place but we need a robust community of advocates to speak up for the voiceless.”— Shane Hanofee

“I came to botany through simple backyard gardening. I simply wanted fresh tomatoes and other veggies that I could harvest a few feet from my back door. That led to an interest in agriculture, particularly small-scale local agriculture, which gave way to permaculture and sustainable methodologies,” says Hanofee. “I came to the conclusion that the role of native plants in these systems was extremely overlooked. This coincided with another epiphany, that community participation is a prerequisite for the success of environmentalism. I couldn’t make the world a better place by myself, from home. I had to get personally involved.”

Upcoming Hikes

Feb. 15 – Ferns – Independence Trail, Nevada City, CA

Feb. 22 – Galls – Kenny Ranch Trail, Grass Valley, CA

Feb. 29 – Spring Fungi – Hidden Falls Regional Park, Auburn, CA

March 7 – Native Trees and Shrubs – McCourtney Road, Grass Valley, CA

March 14 – Native Trees and Shrubs – Yewei’im Bom Trail, Nevada City, CA

March 21 – Wildflowers – American State Recreation Area or nearby, Auburn, CA

March 28 – Native Trees and Shrubs – Cascade Canal Trail, Nevada City, CA

April 4 – Wildflowers – Steven’s Trail, Colfax, CA

April 11 – Wildflowers – Euchre Bar, Alta, CA

April 18 – Geophytes – Spenceville Wildlife Area, Penn Valley, CA

May 2 – Wildflowers – Table Mountain, Oroville, CA

May 9 – Rare Plant Hunt – Cascade Canal Trail, Nevada City, CA

All hikes are rain or shine. Some may require pre-registration. Dates and locations may change.

Bear Yuba Land Trust (BYLT) is an accredited land trust based in Grass Valley with a mission to protect and defend the working and natural lands of the Bear and Yuba River Watersheds and to empower healthy, resilient communities through Nature access and education. Since 1990, BYLT has been a conservation leader in our region, saving more than 15,000 acres of Sierra Nevada and foothill forests, oak woodlands, meadows, riparian habitat, farms and ranches. BYLT has also built and maintains 45 miles of trails for the enjoyment of all. BYLT is a community-based land trust that relies on the generous support of members and volunteers to achieve these collective efforts. Learn more at http://www.bylt.org


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