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The Secret Sisters bring smooth sounds from the south to Grass Valley

With recordings produced by T Bone Burnett and Brandi Carlile, The Secret Sisters bring their southern flavored original music to The Center for the Arts in downtown Grass Valley for a concert on Friday, Aug. 4.
Submitted photo to The Union |

KNOW & GO

Who: The Center for the Arts

What: The Secret Sisters with support from Wolf Creek Boys

When: 8 p.m. Friday

Where: The Center for the Arts, 314 W Main St., Grass Valley

Tickets: $20 members, $24 general public

The Center Box Office — 530-274-8384 ext 14

BriarPatch Co-op Community Market — 530-272-5333

Tickets online at http://www.thecenterforthearts.org

Info: http://thecenterforthearts.org/event/the-secret-sisters/ and http://www.secretsistersband.com

With recordings produced by T Bone Burnett and Brandi Carlile, The Secret Sisters bring their southern-flavored, original music to The Center for the Arts in downtown Grass Valley for a concert at 8 p.m. Friday night. Grass Valley’s Wolf Creek Boys are set to open.

About a 20-minute drive is all that separated The Secret Sisters from being born in historic Muscle Shoals, Alabama, though its proximity to their hometown of Happy Valley may have foretold Laura and Lydia Rogers were destined for lives as recording and performing artists.

Growing up surrounded by the sounds of the south and the powerful timeless music emanating from Muscle Shoals, The Secret Sisters were heavily influenced by a range of uniquely American musical styles, including country, bluegrass and gospel, as well as classic rock and pop. They were raised on everything from George Jones and Loretta Lynn, to The Eagles, Fleetwood Mac, The Ramones, Fiona Apple and Rufus Wainwright.



Their debut album was lauded by critics. The sisters further established themselves as songwriters, which they strived to do on their sophomore album, Put Your Needle Down, an eclectic mix of musical styles and sounds rooted in storytelling.

T Bone Burnett produced their first two albums.




“We became friends with T Bone early on in our career and he was a wonderful guide,” said Lydia Rogers. “I think that recording live is the best way that you can record an album because it really captures a band’s ability to glue themselves to one another and create something beautiful. There is something beautiful and honest about not being perfect.”

Opening the show, Wolf Creek Boys are an acoustic duo hailing from Grass Valley comprised of brothers Mathew and Jerry Sena. Their focus on honest songwriting, as well as a sound that blends Americana influences with their upbringing in the Sierra Nevada foothills, has continued to grow both their live and recorded presence in the northern California music scene.

They spent their first few months playing local open mics, but have since moved on to sharing the stage with Chuck Ragan at venues such as the Sierra Nevada Big Room in Chico and Moes Alley in Santa Cruz.

The Wolf Creek Boys spent most of 2016 playing shows around California and Nevada to support their first self-titled release, and are making plans to continue to tour along the west coast and beyond.


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