Suzie Daggett: Nervous wild energy | TheUnion.com

Suzie Daggett: Nervous wild energy

Suzie Daggett
Columnist

Recently, our area lost several loved community members. Then the fires started. This added to countless fires in Santa Rosa, Napa and Southern California.

The fires come after news blasts of the mass murder in Las Vegas, and other national and international man-made or natural deaths from hurricanes, floods and earthquakes.

All of us know friends or relatives who are or were displaced by these fires or disasters, including those who sadly lost their lives.

Because of the fires, some will have no homes to return to. Others face such destruction around their neighborhoods. They will be affected for years to come. Some will suffer the loss of a loved one forever.

These events scrolled through on social media and viewed on the news can cause intense bouts of extended nervous anxiety and stress. Even if we are not affected, we still pick up on the stunning changes for each person involved.

This nervous energy seeps into our skin and mind, making us jumpy, jangled, off-center and slightly crazed. Living with this wildness can cause many problems.

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How can these energy stress problems be addressed? Decide if the issues are on the surface or if you have buried them. If you need deeper help, find a qualified therapist to help identify if you are suffering from PTSD or other related stress aliments.

Inner peace

Here are a few techniques to help — not cure, but help.

Take a breath — a long slow deep breath down to your belly and hold it for a moment. Close your eyes and concentrate as you do this. Most of us breathe solely to our upper chest. Try to go as far as you can. Do it again, at least three times in a row.

Breathing with concentration brings needed oxygen to our body, helping with stress and soothing nerves.

Get centered — if you find yourself driving and not paying attention, or staring into space or feeling disconnected from yourself and others, it is time to ground yourself. You have heard talk about the present moment, but may have not understood what it means.

It means being here right now, not fusing about the past which is over with, or the future which you cannot control and can change on a dime. All you can control is this moment in time.

Watch the leaves fall, get to yoga or the gym, paint, sing or work in the garage — anything that requires your concentration. This switches your thoughts from your overworked analytic left-brain to your creative right brain, which lives in the moment.

Meditate or pray — use your personal tools by sending loving energy to those who need it most. Be kind, loving and empathetic as you tap into the feelings of others and yourself.

Sink into a prayerful moment, remembering with deep kind love the victims and the dedication of countless first responders, firefighters, doctors, nurses and all the personnel it takes to quell the chaos we witnessed. This alone can be calming and helpful.

These are a few ideas to de-stress and calm your nervous wild energy. They will work if you make a habit of deep breathing, staying in the moment and connecting with those who need it on a heart level.

Suzie Daggett is a writer and speaker. Her newest book is "The Pink Door: Moms' Journey to the Other Side" where she shares her emotional transparent thoughts about the passage from life to death. Suzie.daggett@gmail.com or http://www.suziedaggett.com.