Suzie Daggett: Discerning what is right for you | TheUnion.com

Suzie Daggett: Discerning what is right for you

Suzie Daggett
Columnist

In the confusing midst of a newly discovered or on-going medical situation, you might ask friends and neighbors who they recommend for your issue.

Did they like the doctor or practitioner? Did they use western medicine, alternative therapies or a combination? If so, what worked best? Were they listened to? Were their symptoms relieved? How long did it take to be well?

You research as best you can how much time the medical practitioner spends with patients and whether they hear your individual complaints or sit with their computer taking notes looking for a universal answer. Is their front office efficient, is it possible to get an appointment quickly, do they have hospital privileges? The list is endless.

When you become proactive with your wellness, there is so much to learn and absorb. Discerning which practitioner, which therapy, which doctor, which hospital and which advice to follow can be daunting.

To discern or "to come to know," means you tune into and listen to your innate body signals. You are looking for what will work best for your specific needs.

If you feel your bellyache is odd, it is in your best interest to explain to the practitioner as best you can what is going on. You are the only one who knows your particulars.

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Look within yourself

Take time to fine-tune your inner sense of what is right and what is wrong in your body. Intuition, discernment and insights are part of all of us, but the awareness of following your instinctive knowing may need encouragement. If you have never listened deeply to your own body's needs, here are a few hints:

Find your way to switch from your intellect which says you must use so and so or do a therapy because it is the recommended course of action for the majority of people. Go for a walk and while quiet, ask who/what feels most right for you, then, listen to the first response and do your best to trust the process.

A slight pause will bring a different answer, most likely from your active ego seeking to keep you safe and secure. Keep practicing to discern the difference.

Feel into your right, intuitive brain. You may or may not have used this fabulous part of you, but it is there, always ready to help make valued decisions.

Remember a time when you said to yourself: "I knew that" and yet did nothing and the results were less than sterling. The "I knew that" part is still within you. It is just waiting for you to ask so it can help you.

An answer may come immediately or it may take time. You are inviting an energetic connection to occur. This process is like a light bulb illuminating an unfamiliar space, which has been dark from non-use.

The light may be dim at first then with your focus, it grows in power.

When you feel ready, call for a consultation and/or a second opinion. Discernment is a useful skill allowing you to discover what and who resonates with you and can help solve your issue. It takes practice, trust and patience to hear what is right for you.

Insight: You are unique. Medicines, herbs, therapies, doctors or healing practitioners do not work universally for everyone. A doctor or practitioner who has helped you may not help your friend the same way.

There is no one size fits all in medicine! Remember, you are not a statistic — you are a specific individual with your own distinct needs.

Suzie Daggett is a writer and speaker. Her newest book is "The Pink Door: Moms' Journey to the Other Side" where she shares her thoughts about the passage from life to death. She can be reached at Suzie.daggett@gmail.com or http://www.suziedaggett.com.