Sean Jordan: Embracing the different | TheUnion.com

Sean Jordan: Embracing the different

As I write this on Halloween, sitting in my Beetlejuice costume, I was thinking about being different.

A trend that has been pretty consistent with my life is that I have been kind of an outsider. I didn't go to traditional schools, I didn't have a ton of friends (just a few close ones), and I strayed away from the beaten path more often than not.

You may not guess that with my boisterous personality but I tend to gravitate toward the weird, strange or out there. It fascinates me.

Halloween is one of my favorite holidays and with my wife being an amazing make-up artist, we like to go all-out.

When the costume is complete I start to personify the character. That may seem weird to some but I take great joy in pretending to be a character for a day (maybe because of my acting roots).

Being weird or a little strange is something that I think enhances the norm. If we allow ourselves to be exposed to different things we broaden our horizons 10-fold and experience even more of what life has to offer.

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Which is why I enjoy holidays like Halloween or events like Comic Con.

Strange doesn't just happen once a year, either. I listen to different music, watch independent films and try different foods all the time.

To me my life would be boring if I stuck to the same ol' routine. I have to mix it up.

With that said, someone who shares my view of the strange is KVMR's own Meri St. Mary.

She and I had an excellent chat about her life and the event she has coming up.

Meri was front-and-center during the punk movement in the '70s and '80s. She has stories about any band you could possibly name that performed in that time. Punk music is not for everyone, we get that, but it is an avenue of creativity that encourages people to be themselves, which is something I believe is important.

The event Meri has coming up on Saturday is a film, which has her music featured in it, called, "Pig Death Machine."

Meri and her partner Monte Cazazza, who also has music in the film, will be performing a show with dueling theremins.

If you're not familiar on what a theremin is it's the instrument that makes the sci-fi sounds we've all heard in the movies.

The film itself is absolutely strange, but in a good way, and if you're looking to broaden your horizons this film will definitely do that.

My final thought of the day is do something different, something strange, and enjoy where it takes you.

Contact Prospector Editor Sean Jordan at 530-477-4219 or sjordan@theunion.com.

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