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News from Sierra Nevada Memorial Hospital and Hospital Foundation

 

Those that have fallen in love may not realize there are “feel good” chemicals the body produces. After a breakup or the death of a loved one, the brain stops generating these chemicals, and the body suffers from withdrawal of these feel-good hormones. When this happens, it can cause withdrawal, depression, or for some, can be painful.

For some, this condition is known as Broken Heart Syndrome (BHS), stress cardiomyopathy, or takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Takotsubo is a Japanese name for an octopus trapping pot with a wide bottom and narrow neck. The neck resembles the shape of a distressed left ventricle of the heart seen in BHS.

BHS, a rapid weakening of the heart, is temporary and reversible. Many people experiencing BHS think they are having a heart attack because symptoms such as shortness of breath and chest pain are similar in both conditions. However, BHS doesn’t involve blocked coronary arteries and does not cause permanent heart damage.

While symptoms generally mimic a heart attack, it is caused by sudden physical and emotional stress. Emotional stressors include grieving over the death of a loved one or intense fear caused by anything from public speaking, to being the victim of a crime. Anger can also trigger BHS in situations such as road rage, being involved in a physical altercation, or a tragic car accident.

Physical stressors vary and can include an exhausting physical event, severe pain, or chronic health issues such as an asthma attack, dyspnea (difficulty breathing), seizures, and strokes.

Approximately two percent of patients that present with a suspected heart attack are experiencing BHS. It is predominant in women (88%) in later middle-age, generally after menopause. One theory is that estrogen (a female hormone) protects the heart against harmful effects of hormone release in response to stress. As the level of estrogen declines, generally between ages 58 to 77, women may become more susceptible to high levels of stress.

When suffering from BHS, the steady rhythm of the heart muscle is disrupted. Sometimes the lower part of the ventricle enlarges temporarily. It can also lead to forceful contractions in other areas of the heart.

Can someone die of BHS? While complications are rare, they can include a rupture or blockage of blood flow of the left ventricle, heart failure, and cardiogenic shock. Although it is not impossible, about one percent of cases result in death.

Treatment varies depending on severity, although it is generally treated with medications. Your physician may prescribe ACE inhibitors to lower blood pressure, beta blockers to slow heart rate, or diuretics to decrease fluid buildup. Where stress is extreme, anti-anxiety medicines may be a path toward recovery.

For those whose heart muscle has been seriously impacted, cardiac rehabilitation may be recommended. Some people opt for self-care such as yoga, meditation, and other relaxation techniques. Only about five percent of people have more than one episode of BHS. Most cases will clear up in one to four weeks with full recovery within two months.

Fall scene

 

The changing colors of leaves along the Cascade Canal Trail in Nevada City hint that fall is on its way.
Photo by Lee Anna Strandberg

 

Male Voice Choir has new musical director

 

After 25 years under the direction of Eleanor Kenitzer, the Grass Valley Male Voice Choir is emerging from the pandemic under the direction of accomplished local musician George Husaruk.

Kenitzer will continue leading the Cornish Carol Choir during the Christmas holidays, but has retired as director of the men’s choir and turned the conductor’s baton over to Husaruk.

“George is the kind of energetic leader the group needs to move forward as our lives finally begin to return to normal,” Kenitzer said. “I know that under his leadership, they will be able to attract new, younger members while still continuing to honor the traditions of the group.”

Husaruk began his musical training on the violin at the age of 6 in Montreal, Canada, later adding lessons in flute and recorder. After moving with his parents to Los Angeles in 1960, he performed in school bands, then graduated with a BA in Economics and a minor in Music from UCLA. He received his teaching credential from CSU Los Angeles and later enrolled in that school’s Master of Music program.

In addition to directing school and church bands and choirs in Tulare and Mendocino counties, Husaruk also taught guitar, the histories of classical and rock music, math and science.

Husaruk moved with his wife Katharine to Nevada City in 2019. He is a member of the Nevada County Concert Band, two folk-Americana groups, a jazz and a rock band, and plays music at the Nevada City United Methodist Church with the group Spirit Rising.

“We have big plans for the choir, possibly including a name change,” said Husaruk, “and I’m excited to be part of this new evolution of the group.” The choir is presently scheduled to present a Christmas concert at Peace Lutheran Church in Grass Valley at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 18, in accordance with public health directives in place at that time.

Recently retired director of the Grass Valley Male Voice Choir Eleanor Kenitzer looks with approval at their new director George Husaruk.
Provided photo

‘World-class music’: InConcert Sierra honors outgoing board president

InConcert Sierra, a Nevada County classical chamber music presenter, wants to give a well-deserved shout-out to Monroe Lovelady, who recently stepped down as president of its board after serving in that capacity for the past five years. Not only did Monroe effectively shepherd InConcert through the productive growth years of 2016 to early 2020, but he guided the organization’s successful maneuvers through tough times when COVID-19 suddenly canceled everything, including a concert featuring the internationally renowned co-directors of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center that was scheduled for the upcoming weekend.

Monroe was born in the tiny rural town of Marfa, West Texas, currently one of the arts and entertainment hotspots in that state, and raised with Spanish as his first language. Because he was around native speakers, he acquired unaccented pronunciation of both English and Spanish, which proved advantageous in his later business life.

After receiving a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Cornell University in Ithaca, NY, he then moved to Dallas to work for a utility company for four years. His next move was to San Francisco to work on the Alaska Pipeline as a project engineer for Standard Oil, traveling often to the 49th state over a four-year period. During the following sixteen years, Monroe established himself as an engineering consultant, working with clients worldwide. When he grew tired of traveling, he shifted his focus to information technology consulting, working as a computer software developer for Bank of America from 2001 through 2015. He contends that he then retired.

However, Monroe continues to actively manage his own company. For twenty-five years, he has been running Axiom, an exporter of American-made industrial equipment. Many of his clients are located in South America, so his fluent Spanish is a definite asset.

Monroe took piano lessons as a child, then started again in 2008 when he met Aileen James, the former executive director of the American Pianist Association, who was active with InConcert Sierra. He continues as a part of the Piano Workshop, a group of experienced pianists, formerly led by Aileen and now directed by Ken Hardin, InConcert’s Artistic Director. As a kid, Monroe loved all kinds of music, but wasn’t exposed to classical music; he developed his love for classical music as an older adult. He’s now been exposed to the full gamut in the Piano Workshop, from early Baroque to modern day (but has never developed an affinity for Mozart).

He moved to Nevada County in 1989, building a house in Penn Valley. He was introduced to InConcert by a friend who brought him to a concert; Monroe was impressed by the world class quality of the music and welcoming ambiance. He joined the board of InConcert in 2009, became president in 2016, then stepped down in June of 2021 to his present board position of “past president” and member of the executive committee. He says that the position of president was a lot of work, but very gratifying; “It’s a privilege to be involved with InConcert Sierra because of the world class music that the organization presents.” Monroe notes that his predecessors had shaped a solvent, successful non-profit, and he wanted to keep doing more of the same. He believes he has passed on a well-run organization to new board president.

As if being president of the board didn’t consume enough time, he has undertaken a number of other responsibilities, both in and outside of InConcert. Because he is a foodie and loves cooking and eating (as well as acquiring and consuming good wine), Monroe developed the Taste of Classics — a series of InConcert events featuring a gourmet dinner cooked by a well-known chef and accompanied by live classical music— and has also been the maestro behind many food needs at InConcert events. He also volunteers for Sierra Stages, a local theater company. And now that InConcert has moved into new offices in the Whispering Pines Industrial Park, Monroe has spent hours setting up all the technology for the office, including Wi-Fi, entry security and surveillance. In his “free time,” he likes to tinker with cars and gadgets as well as maintain his ranch and horses.

So, thank you very much, Monroe, from all those who love and appreciate InConcert Sierra. But be assured, we won’t let you get far away.

Hindi Greenberg is president of the Board of InConcert Sierra

InConcert Sierra, a Nevada County classical chamber music presenter, wants to give a well-deserved shout-out to Monroe Lovelady, who recently stepped down as president of its board after serving in that capacity for the past five years.
Provided photo

Nevada County Captures: Concert time!

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Then submit your photos to The Union’s “Nevada County Captures” page to be published in our print and online editions.

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Judy Silberman's hit neighborhood concert, a few blocks from downtown Grass Valley.
Submitted by Velvy Appleton
Margaret Urke sitting on the bench dedicated to her late husband, Al Urke, by Peardale-Chicago Park Fire Department.
Submitted by Charles Hooper
Carole and Keith Yettick of Nevada City celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on Sept. 16. The cake topper and the napkins were originals from the wedding.
Submitted by Keith Yettick
Signs of Halloween showing up on Mill Street in Grass Valley!
Submitted by Sandra Boyd
Signs of Halloween showing up on Mill Street in Grass Valley!
Submitted by Sandra Boyd
Susan Shanelec with the kayak club at Elkhorn Slough with white pelicans.
Submitted by Alan Cary
“ART on the CHEAP” at a home for sale in Sunset View.
Submitted by Marci Ficarra

 

Evening soiree, benefit Sunday for Wildlife Rehab & Release

A fundraiser will be held this Sunday, Sept. 26, from 3 to 8 p.m. to benefit Nevada County Wildlife Rehab and Release. The organization accepts injured wildlife and rehabilitates them for release back into the wild. Nevada County friends Marissa Turner and Chris Rector joined forced to organize the backyard “Evening Soiree and Benefit Show.” This is the first-time organizing a fundraiser for Turner, who felt the need to do something when she found out the nonprofit has been depleted of funds and has been unable to help some of the injured critters coming to them. Turner said the group needs volunteers and money, so she and Rector are doing what they can to help.

“They treat the animals they can on site but often have to transport the animals to a facility in Sacramento. Recently they have not had the funds or drivers to get the animals transported and some don’t survive,” said Turner. “Wildlife Rehab and Rescue are in desperate need of our help right now so please join us for an evening of music, food, drink and raffle!”

Live music will be provided by three individual female acts including Tamara, Iona Swift and Leta Gibney. They are mellow, beautiful voices who sing jazz, folk and Turner said, Tamara is a Spanish singer, “We actually met Tamara at the Wildlife Rehab building when she was turning in an injured bird she had found and when we told her what we were doing, she offered to come and play for us.”

The event is being held in a large outdoor area at 449 Washington Street in Nevada City. Many area businesses have donated raffle prizes for which the organizers are grateful. Turner said it’s a great way to bring the community together for a great cause. “It’s been especially nice in these difficult times to see the light in people’s eyes as they give back. It’s cool to see people being down to help in their community.“

All ages are welcome with a suggested donation of $10. The Ham Stand will be selling tapas and both alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages will be available for purchase. If you’re unable to join but would like to contribute to the cause, you can Venmo @animaldonate use #5401 to confirm the account. Nevada County Wildlife Rehab & Release is located on Maltman Drive in Grass Valley.

Source: Nevada County Wildlife Rehab & Release

KNOW & GO

WHO: Nevada County Wildlife Rehab & Release

WHAT: Evening Soiree and Benefit Show

WHEN: Sunday, Sept. 26, from 3 to 8 p.m.

WHERE: 449 Washington Street in Nevada City

DONATE: Venmo @animaldonate use #5401 to confirm the account

Nevada County Captures: Exploring

SUBMIT A PHOTO

Have you captured the faces, places and events of our lovely community? Need help finding a lost pet?

Then submit your photos to The Union’s “Nevada County Captures” page to be published in our print and online editions.

Send submissions to photos@theunion.com, or to our submissions page at https://www.theunion.com/photo-submissions/

Also check out our Instagram Page and tag us @theunionnews!

And please remember to include your name and a caption with your submission. Thank you!

Oliver exploring the rail area behind the Nevada County Railroad Museum in Nevada City.
Submitted by Sandra Boyd
A crystal clear evening presents a beautiful moonrise over Lake Wildwood, Sunday, Sept. 19. (Photo captured from a boat the photographer was in.)
Submitted by Gaylord Z Spurgeon
Freshly painted historic home and the proud painters on Walsh Street in Grass Valley.
Submitted by John Ringewald

 

This feeder is not for you guys!
Submitted by Harry Wyeth
Who knew soccer could be such a colorful sport!
Submitted by Diane Mercer
Dixie Fire clean-up operation on Highway 36.
Submitted by Glenn Freitas
Dixie Fire clean-up operation on Highway 36.
Submitted by Glenn Freitas

 

Keeping it clean

 

The South Yuba River Citizens League recently hosted their 24th Annual Yuba River Cleanup, a week-long effort that ended Sept. 18. Volunteers helped to remove trash from trails and beaches by choosing from a self-guided clean up route or by taking part in the community-wide Yuba River Cleanup on the final day. Over the past 20 years, the Yuba River Cleanup has removed more than 120 tons of garbage and recycling from the river. While volunteering, photographer Lee Anna Strandberg captured the magic of Hoyt’s Crossing on the south fork of the Yuba River.
Lee Anna Strandberg

News from Sierra Nevada Memorial Hospital and Hospital Foundation

We’ve all seen it while driving — emergency vehicles rushing down the street, sirens screaming and red lights flashing as cars pull out of the way. Getting to an emergency quickly is essential, and often more challenging in a rural region. Whether our team is rushing a critical patient from an accident to the hospital, bringing in a seriously ill COVID-19 patient, or transferring someone to another location, Dignity Health Sierra Nevada Memorial Hospital’s (SNMH) ambulances are an essential service.

Annually, nearly 10 million rural Americans receive Emergency Medical Services (EMS) care. There are 23,272 ambulance agencies in the U.S. with 73% of those reporting serving rural areas. A record number of ambulance services have closed across the country leaving 60 million people at risk of being stranded in a medical emergency.

SNMH is one of the few hospitals that owns their ambulances. Fully committed to serving the community, these ambulances serve a population of 75,000 residents in Grass Valley, Lake of the Pines, Alta Sierra, and smaller regions such as the towns of Washington, Rough and Ready and North San Juan.

In addition to serving our region’s emergency care calls, over the past two years, these ambulances recently assisted at the Jones, River and Bennett fires. In addition, they have deployed to assist with the Paradise fire, the Dixie fire and the Caldor fire, and the Oroville dam crisis.

The SNMH ambulance program is licensed through the CA Highway Patrol which is licensed by the Sierra Sacramento Valley Emergency Medical Services Authority. The State of California has a 250,000 cap on allowable mileage for ambulances, which is a reason there is turnover in the fleet.

The department has 56 employees with one-half being EMTs and one-half paramedics. There are three supervisors for every 24 hours. For each call there are two staff members, an EMT, and a paramedic. If there is a significant incident, a paramedic supervisor will come to the location.

There are eight ambulances in the fleet. Five run during the day and three at night. Penn Valley and Truckee ambulance services back-up SNMH’s program and our department reciprocates service for them. The rule of thumb is to have one-quarter of your fleet backed-up in case of emergency or disaster calls, routine maintenance, and other possible failures.

Fielding over 10,000 calls a year, nearly 6,500 patients are transported to the hospital accounting for 21% of the total emergency department patient volume. There is an 82% transport rate. Eighteen percent are cared for onsite or won’t go despite medical advice. Each ambulance makes approximately 1,200 calls a year and will transport approximately 825 of those patients either to our hospital or another facility.

Our ambulance program is a gateway to our community and an integral part of caring for those that need emergency care. This means staying current with the latest technologies, equipment, supplies and a vehicle that can manage difficult terrain. In an emergency situation, you want to know help is on the way.

Nevada County Captures: Walled in

SUBMIT A PHOTO

Have you captured the faces, places and events of our lovely community? Need help finding a lost pet?

Then submit your photos to The Union’s “Nevada County Captures” page to be published in our print and online editions.

Send submissions to photos@theunion.com, or to our submissions page at https://www.theunion.com/photo-submissions/

Also check out our Instagram Page and tag us @theunionnews!

And please remember to include your name and a caption with your submission. Thank you!

The walls are up. Chapa-De Indian Health construction continues.
Submitted by Jeff Rogers
Extreme limbing in Morgan Ranch.
Submitted by Lee Laizure
Grandson Jordan Jiannino's twilight ride at Riverfront MX Park, Marysville.
Submitted by Richard Hill
Back to school for this teacher!
Submitted by Sue Clark
The Yuba River and bridge down Highway 20 with the Sutter Buttes in background. Looks like a lot of water considering the drought. Photo taken Sunday, Sept. 19.
Submitted by Elany Prusa