Robert Bee: We don’t want to be the next Venezuela | TheUnion.com

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Robert Bee: We don’t want to be the next Venezuela

I found myself in agreement with much of what Don Rogers wrote in the column entitled, "Start at the core" — with one major exception.

His description of the causes and cures for our dysfunctional "political discourse" was badly oversimplified and grossly unrealistic.

Americans today are staring down the barrel of another civil war, and changing the way we talk to one another will not alter that inevitability. Listening to and respecting the divergent views of others might work for forest management or homelessness or unemployment, but each of these issues is not at the core of our national identity.

In the past year, the political dialog in America has gone way beyond how should we address this issue or fix that problem. It has become a struggle over the fundamental change from our democratic republic to its political and social opposite — socialism. One hundred and seventy years after the founding of the first colony in Jamestown, Virginia, our Declaration of Independence, and subsequently our Constitution, established our republic on the principles of personal liberty and religious freedom.

Polite political discourse has become oxymoronic because it is really about the complete and total destruction of the fundamental values that built this country in the fight against tyranny during the 17th and 18th centuries.

The further left one slides on the political scale, the more belief there is in socialism, communism, a world community with no borders, and all of this nonsense is neatly wrapped in rabid anti-Americanism. Polite political discourse has become oxymoronic because it is really about the complete and total destruction of the fundamental values that built this country in the fight against tyranny during the 17th and 18th centuries.

And the scariest part of all is that leftists in this country are resorting to more and more violence and the threat of violence in the pursuit of their vision for a new America. They shout down speakers at colleges; they burn buildings; they destroy automobiles and businesses; they block highways, bridges and airports; they occupy state capitals; and they terrorize individuals whenever and wherever it suits their goals.

"All we have to do is listen to understand?" The more patriotic Americans listen to leftist rhetoric and watch violent leftist "protests," the more we understand that we are in a struggle for the very heart and soul of our national identity.

There is never anything civil about civil war, and if American patriots don't stand up to those who would like to see this country become the next Venezuela, our future as the nation our forefathers envisioned in the 17th and 18th centuries is truly bleak.

Robert C. Bee lives in Grass Valley.