January 24, 2013 | Back to: Columns

Brown’s optimistic speech featured education reform

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Cheering a California rebound, Gov. Jerry Brown delivered a State of the State address Thursday that laid out the legacy-building ideas he will work on during the second part of his term, including K-12 education reform, high-speed rail and the largest upgrade to the state’s water-delivery system in decades.

The Democratic governor delivered his address just months after voters approved his Proposition 30, which raised sales and income taxes temporarily and is expected to generate $6 billion a year in additional revenue.

Brown mostly used his speech to congratulate voters and lawmakers for having an optimistic vision of California. The state, he said, “has once again confounded our critics.” He promised an end to the deep budget deficits that have plagued lawmakers and governors for most of the decade.

“Against those who take pleasure, singing of our demise, California did the impossible,” he said.

Brown’s speech was filled with the rhetorical gems and historical references that are hallmarks of his addresses, from the biblical story of Pharaoh’s dream about fat and lean cows emerging from the river to the Spanish adventurers who forged north into modern-day California. But it did not break new ground.

The main topics Brown included have been addressed previously, including in his budget proposal earlier this month. Those include reform of K-12 education funding, the need for the higher education systems to hold down costs, promotion of the $68 billion high-speed rail system, the continued need to combat climate change and building massive twin water tunnels under the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta at a cost of $14 billion.

His speech mainly seemed intended to mark the lasting achievements he hopes to leave after his latest run in the governor’s office is over. Brown served from 1975-83, in the era before term limits, before being elected to his latest term in 2010.

Despite the big ticket projects Brown sees as a priority, he urged the Legislature to practice fiscal restraint with the additional tax money approved by voters.

“We have promises to keep,” he told a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chamber. “And the most important is the one we made to the voters if Proposition 30 passed: that we would guard jealously the money temporarily made available.”

Juliet Williams
Associated Press


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The Union Updated Jan 25, 2013 08:03AM Published Jan 25, 2013 07:48AM Copyright 2013 The Union. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.