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Bruce Herring

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March 11, 2014
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Wolf Creek Parkway should be economic development plan centerpiece

Much ado lately in local press and other spheres concerning the future of Grass Valley. Citizens, elected officials, print journalists, bloggers and other characters have bandied about a variety of notions.

At issue: What is, what has, and what will really revitalize Grass Valley?

It has been suggested the new Dorsey interchange is the true “silver bullet.”

It has been suggested a new “Lifestyle Mall” at the interchange is the key to our future, complete with a big or at least a medium box.

“It’s what the people want.”

Not long ago the buzz was the re-opening of the Idaho-Maryland Mine.

Before that it was Loma Rica, other annexations, the shopping malls, and heck, even the freeway itself.

Brilliant idea that freeway, and convenient.

Of course, great swaths of private and commercial property were condemned, Nevada City lost the old gazebo, and Wolf Creek sentenced to run underground through tunnels and culverts for much of its downtown reach.

A bit further back are the mines themselves, the mills, Lake Olympia, the Narrow Gauge Railroad, and …

Except for a portion of the original Loma Rica plan, these ideas and “improvements” — while visionary to varying degrees — are all based on quite conventional 19th or 20th century thought.

All have brought, or will bring, some gain. All have tradeoffs.

Everything does.

Several recent comments aim to push the conversation toward a 21st century framework.

One suggests we are leaving history out of the equation. Others call for a comprehensive outlook instead of the usual piece-meal strategy.

Steve Frisch of the Sierra Business Council goes one step further to suggest folks today “want to live, work, shop and be entertained in the place they live; they want to walk and ride bikes; they want access to trails and open space; they want affordable starter housing for working people because young people can’t afford the single family residential American dream anymore; people crave authenticity and a sense of place.”

Two things. One, the City of Grass Valley has secured a grant to pursue a Comprehensive Economic Development Plan.

I am told by high level city staffers that a multi-year series of public meetings will commence sometime later this year to do just that. Fabulous.

Two. Yes, a comprehensive outlook with a broad perspective is indeed a welcome idea. But the discourse must also include the age-old concept of the Commons.

To be sure Grass Valley and western Nevada County need to continue moving forward economically.

But as Mr. Frisch suggests, we should do so authentically and with a renewed sense of “place.”

The common thread through Grass Valley is Wolf Creek.

Like most “commons,” it has been virtually invisible, neglected, used, and abused since the get-go in the 1850s.

Commons in general are taken for granted and not valued in the complex accounting of GDP and “economic growth.”

And yet in their wisdom the Grass Valley City Council unanimously approved a Conceptual Plan for a Wolf Creek Parkway in 2006.

A Wolf Creek Trail is mentioned in city documents as early as 1999 and is included in the Downtown Strategic Plan.

Little or nothing has happened in the last eight years to move the concept forward.

The time to do so is now. The Wolf Creek Parkway can and should stand as the centerpiece of any comprehensive economic development plan.

Yes for the creek’s sake, but more importantly for ours.

We need a healthy visible accessible creek to revitalize ourselves.

A place to walk, a place to bike, a place to just sit by moving water will provide a profound sense of place and connection to the natural world.

It will help each of us feel good about our town. Citizens and visitors alike will benefit from the shared values derived from Wolf Creek, the “real gold in Grass Valley.”

Urban river and creek restoration has boosted property values and economic vitality in San Luis Obispo, Napa, Santa Rosa, Ashland, Ore. and Tempe, Ariz.

Plans are underway for a major rehabilitation of the Los Angeles River. Freeway interchanges, bridges, and places to shop locally are indeed essential to our vitality, as would be high-speed Internet access.

But the Wolf Creek Parkway will make a statement and put Grass Valley “on the map.” The Parkway epitomizes a bold move into 21st century thinking.

Let the conversation continue. For additional information please visit the website of the Wolf Creek Community Alliance.

Bruce Herring lives in Grass Valley.

It will help each of us feel good about our town. Citizens and visitors alike will benefit from the shared values derived from Wolf Creek, the “real gold in Grass Valley.”


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The Union Updated Mar 11, 2014 11:42PM Published Mar 11, 2014 11:42PM Copyright 2014 The Union. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.