Nevada City Farmers Market becomes a year-round event | TheUnion.com

Nevada City Farmers Market becomes a year-round event

Teresa Yinmeng Liu
Staff Writer

Merchants from the Nevada City Farmers Market will soon be able to bring fresh fruits, vegetables, homemade goods and other produce to residents and visitors during the cold winter months as well as summer months.

The Nevada City Council on Wednesday voted 5-0 to approve a request by the Nevada City Farmers Market Association to hold a smaller scale certified farmers market in Robinson Plaza on the first Saturday of each month from December 2016 to May 2017.

"The market has been a fabulous addition to Nevada City," said Council member David Parker. "Not only for residents, but it's been a draw for people to enjoy the town."

Councilwoman Valerie Moberg said extending the farmers market to a year-round event is a great use of space at Robinson Plaza.

The existing market on Union Street begins June 4 and ends Nov. 9. The winter-spring version of the establishment will consist of six booths of farmers and ranchers. It will take place from 9 a.m. to noon. No street closures will be enforced.

Also on Wednesday, council members unanimously approved a resolution to direct the city staff to update the engineer plan and prepare a funding strategy for a complete Pioneer Park swimming pool shell replacement.

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An original plan called for resurfacing the deteriorating swimming pool shell. City officials anticipated spending $209,000 for the project, which would sustain the use of the pool for 10 to 20 years. But the bids staff received from two companies exceeded the estimate construction fee by $135,000.

"We feel like that was too much for structural, for that kind of expense we'd rather get something that lasts longer," said City Engineer Bryan McAlister.

Council members approved a motion to reject all bids for the original renovation plan Wednesday.

McAlister said the existing pool shell was put in place in the '80s. A new pool shell would cost the city $500,000 to $600,000, but would last 20 to 30 years.

He hopes to complete the project before the summer hits.

In other business, City Council approved four draft goals for 2014 to 2017. These objectives were discussed during the annual planning retreat on Aug. 25. They include: enhance and maintain city infrastructure and facilities; improve and manage fiscal stability and sustainability; reduce homelessness and transient population; and increase community awareness and involvement.

City officials will meet again on Feb. 13 to review progress on the completion of these objectives.

To contact Staff Writer Teresa Yinmeng Liu, please email tliu@theunion.com, or call 530-477-4236.

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