‘Everyday’ Nevada County psychic stars in film trailer for potential reality TV pilot | TheUnion.com

‘Everyday’ Nevada County psychic stars in film trailer for potential reality TV pilot

Keri Brenner
Staff Writer

Aside from a whiff of unexplainable magic in the air, jury selection at a trial in Nevada County about 10 years ago was going very smoothly.

The defense lawyer's then-paralegal, Tiffany "Marin" Graves of Grass Valley, had an uncanny sense of the hearts and minds of prospective jurors. She said she seemed to be able to "feel" each person's emotions — and, based on that, offer a "yea" or "nay" about each one.

"I was able to do profiling," said Graves, who at that time was planning to go to law school. "If we were in settlement talks, I was able to say, 'If we offer them this amount of money, we can settle this, now.'"

Fast-forward a decade. Graves, now 37, is posing for independent film director Cristian Ubilla in front of her "Wisdom Wagon," a mobile psychic reading parlor that her dad, Ron Bost, custom-built for her over a two-year period.

“The most rewarding part of my job is helping people with relationships and helping to serve as a medium for relatives who have crossed over who still may have messages they want to communicate.”Tiffany “Marin” Graveslocal psychic

She has been working as a professional psychic reader for eight years — ever since her courtroom days when she realized her hidden gift might be a clue to her career destiny.

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It is the third day of shooting with Graves for a film trailer for a potential reality TV pilot portraying "a day in the life" of everyday psychics.

Like Graves, "everyday" psychics might volunteer help with a son's football team, drive a carpool or take a belly dance class — in between shuffling a tarot card deck in her downtown Grass Valley parlor, predicting romance for a client or acting as a medium to deliver messages to a grieving family from a relative who has passed away.

"I love Marin, as she balances her psychic ability with common sense," said longtime friend and fellow football mom Hollie Grimaldi Flores.

"She does not push her gift, but is great about offering insight when asked," said Grimaldi Flores, business development manager at The Union. "I admire her as a person with a high level of education who has found a way to incorporate her intuitive gift into a career."

The film shoot has included a trip to the Lucky Mojo Hoodoo Rootwork festival in Forestville — where Graves gave a presentation on magic stones — to shots around her Grass Valley home and in the downtown area.

Ubilla is on contract to shoot the film trailer for California Psychics, a worldwide telephone hotline that employs more than 400 psychic readers, including Graves.

Ubilla said California Psychics selected Graves as one of seven staff members to be in the project because she is "authentic."

"She's one of the most evolved," said Ubilla, of Los Angeles. "She has rock-star quality."

Carrie McCray, director of operations for California Psychics, echoed Ubilla's comments.

"She's got a great personality," McCray said. "Customers love her, and she's very highly rated.

"She encompasses the brand of what we're trying to do," McCray added. "Ordinary people you wouldn't think were psychic who have exceptional abilities."

For her part, Graves said she hesitated about filming the trailer because she has worked hard to stay low-profile.

A Nevada County resident since age 10, Graves said she puts a top priority on integrating her alternative career with the typical life of a Nevada County wife with two sons, ages 10 and 15.

"My tagline is: 'A gypsy grounded in reality,'" she said.

In the eight years that she has run her professional psychic reading practice, she has avoided advertising or even installing a sign outside her downtown Grass Valley office.

"I have maintained a really discreet presence," Graves added. "People want to maintain confidentiality when they come to see me."

But, in the case of the film trailer and potential reality TV show, Graves said her intuitive sense told her not to pass up the opportunity.

"I just felt, 'This could be big,'" she said.

Unlike actress Patricia Arquette's character in the popular TV show, "The Medium," Graves said she has never worked with local police to solve crimes or find missing persons. She's talked with her husband, a volunteer for a local search and rescue group, about trying her hand in locating missing persons, but never pursued it.

Graves said her specialty is more as an "empath," meaning that she picks up feelings rather than specific locations.

Also, she said she works best when the person she is reading is close by.

"Sometimes, when someone hugs me, I may get an electrical jolt," she said. "Or if someone just looks at me, I can tell what he or she is feeling."

Graves, who is pursuing a doctorate in parapsychology from the University of Sedona, also volunteers as a spiritual counselor and medium at a local hospital for people who have come back from near-death experiences or who have lost a family member.

"The most rewarding part of my job is helping people with relationships and helping to serve as a medium for relatives who have crossed over who still may have messages they want to communicate," Graves said.

She learned as a young adult how to turn her intuitive senses on and off, and also how to shield herself so that she can function in daily life without being bombarded by other people's internal workings.

"Even more rewarding on a greater scope is being able to delicately introduce magic to people, where they can incorporate a bit of it into their daily lives," Graves said. "And, (being able to see) how that awareness will help them develop their own spirituality."

For more information, see http://maringraves.com

To contact Staff Writer Keri Brenner, email kbrenner@theunion.com or call 530-477-4239.

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