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April 4, 2013
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Flamenco performance comes to Sutton Cinemas

The next in a series of classical ballets presented in high definition at Sutton Cinemas will screen Tuesday and Wednesday. Last month’s sold-out showing of a historic performance of “Swan Lake” starring Rudolph Nureyev and Margot Fonteyn was a memorable event for dance lovers in the community. This month the stage moves to Madrid, where the Antonio Gades Company performs two famous flamenco ballets: “Blood Wedding (Bodas de Sangre)” and “Suite Flamenca.”

In 1974, Spanish dancer and choreographer Antonio Gades took a huge step forward for Spanish dance with the creation of his ballet, “Blood Wedding,” or “Bodas de Sangre,” based on the play by Federico García Lorca, who in turn was inspired by the news of an incident that took place in Nijar in 1928. It was adapted for ballet by Alfredo Mañas, who had already collaborated with Antonio 10 years before in Don Juan.

The company, which at that time had under 20 members, was in charge of staging the work, and the venue chosen for the world premiere was the Olympic Theatre in Rome, April 2, 1974.

In reflecting about the ballet, the dancer and choreographer said: “With ‘Blood Wedding,’ I wanted to pay homage to the poet, though I had to go to Rome for its premiere. I was born into a Mediterranean culture, which is a culture of jealousy, love and death that doesn’t just exist in dance but also in literature and painting and other arts. A sense of tragedy is always present. ‘Blood Wedding’ is really a Spanish story, a tragedy imbued with folklore. I’ve always been interested in Lorca’s work, mainly because it describes the density and intentions of the Andalusian people in depth,” he said.

Antonio referred to one of the most exciting scenes in the ballet, the fight at the end between Leonardo and the Groom, which in a way sums up his attitude to creativity and performance in his art: “That fight is the most difficult thing I’ve done in my whole life. I expect a lot of myself, I expect everything. I want to synthesise that pain, dance like a man that is going to die and is meeting his death with austerity, without becoming frantic or making a spectacle,” he said.

Antonio Gades passed away at the age of 67 in 2004, but his legacy lives on with his company, made up of people who were intimately known and trusted by Antonio. His ballets “Blood Wedding,” “Carmen” and “El Amor Brujo” were famously captured on film by director Carlos Saura in the 1980s. Don’t miss this rare opportunity to see a live performance of these sensational works.

Tickets for Ballet in HD are $9 for adults and $7 for seniors and children. Advanced tickets are available at Sutton Cinemas box office or at http://sierratheaters.com.

Also coming to Sutton Cinemas in the Ballet in HD Series:

May 7 and 8: Mahler “3rd Symphony Ballet” - Paris Opera Ballet

June 4 and 5: “La Sylphide Ballet” - Paris Opera Ballet


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The Union Updated Apr 4, 2013 11:37AM Published Apr 4, 2013 02:20AM Copyright 2013 The Union. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.