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November 8, 2012
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Musical activists support Dine` grandmothers

There are musicians and there are activists. And then there are musicians that act. Each year, for the last 20 years, Clan Dyken, a regional and inspiring rock, family folk activist band, get on a biodiesel bus and tour California and Oregon for a series of concerts that raise awareness and supply needed funds for a group of the Dine` people of Northern Arizona. This tour, called the Beauty Way Tour raises money specifically for food, supplies and firewood for Dine` people who maintain their way of life and live on Hopi Partition Lands.

This area includes high elevation desert family sites with names, such as Big Mountain, Tseeto, Dove Springs, Jeddito, Star Mountain and Sand Springs. Big Mountain, in particular, is a sacred mountain south of the four corners area and on top of the largest coal reserve in America.

The Beauty Way Tour generated and sustained by Calaveras-based musicians, Clan Dyken, raises funds for the annual Thanksgiving Run. Each year, members of the band and supporters from around the world during Thanksgiving week, travel to remote areas of the Navajo-Hopi reservation to deliver organic food, supplies and firewood to families and grandmothers.

Another activist group, Black Mesa Indigenous Support Group, gathers more than 100 volunteers and caravan to the Black Mesa area. Volunteers are sent out to Dine` families to fix hogans, build corrals, herd sheep, chop wood, haul water or do whatever it is families need.

The Beauty Way Tour will stop this year at Seamans Lodge, 427 Nimrod St., Nevada City, Saturday.

Tickets can be purchased in advance at Sweetland Garden Supply in downtown North San Juan, or at BriarPatch Co-op. Advance tickets include dinner and music and are a suggested donation of $24. At the door, tickets are $28.

Roberto Garcia opens up the event at 5 p.m. with a blessing. A turkey dinner follows (vegetarian options as well). Music and performances will begin at 7 p.m.

Donating their talents to raise money for this cause are the following:

The Maidu Theater Group, “Weye Wewe Yewe,” led by Maidu Ferrell Cunningham, will perform all original Maidu language songs and skits. Their motto is “Don’t worry. It’s our pleasure.”

Clan Dyken will play its brand of tribal-funk-folk-rock -soul music that bares its extraordinary passion for peace and justice. Its message of action dances us into activism.

Keith Greeninger, Santa Cruz-based folk rock singer, songwriter, and longtime member of City Folk, captivates us with his deep textured voice and heartfelt vocals that conjure up powerful images of his many experiences. Information about Greeninger’s current album Wind River Crossing, previous albums and tour dates can www.keithgreeninger.com.

Dayan Kai, master of keys, strings, winds and skins was once asked, “How many instruments do you play?” His reply was, “I don’t know. I haven’t tried them all.” Kai is a classically trained multiinstrumentalist. Playing with Keith Greeninger, this magic duo creates enchanting rhythms. Solo, Kai has produced five albums where you can hear his abundant talents in jazz, folk, rock, classical and world genres. For information, visit www.dayankai.com

Bodhi Busick’s motivating and honest lyrics stem from his lifetime residency in Nevada County. Growing up near the Yuba River, Busick became a grassroots activist with a deep concern for natural, spiritual and world affairs. He is attuned with the working man, nature and indigenous issues. Busick’s is an authentic singer-songwriter who writes and sings from his soul.

For information or to get involved, contact www.clandyken.com or www.blackmesaais.org. For the local benefit, to volunteer or contribute to the silent auction, contact Darlene at popeye859@gmail.com or (530) 265-8561.


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The Union Updated Nov 8, 2012 07:03AM Published Nov 8, 2012 07:08AM Copyright 2012 The Union. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.